Announcements

ANNOUNCEMENT BULLETIN

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/28/21

Apply to be a Wayne Morse Scholar!  

Applications are due by midnight Friday, May 28. 

https://waynemorsecenter.uoregon.edu/scholars

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/28/21

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/28/21

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/27/21

 

Upcoming Events/Lectures:

Identity, Ambivalence, Homecoming: Travels Between Asian and Asian American Studies

This conversation explores the relationship between Asian studies and Asian American studies, reflecting on both the commonalities as well as distinctions between these endeavors. Each of these fields bears a distinct disciplinary orientation—Asian studies derives from Cold War-era area studies and Asian American studies from activist-inspired ethnic studies. How can these different perspectives be brought together productively? Moreover, in an atmosphere of fear caused by the pandemic, racial hostility often blurs the distinctions between "Asian" and “Asian American." How can this moment of common vulnerability renew dialogues between these two fields in a continued endeavor to articulate global justice?

Thursday, May 13

5:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. (PST)

Speakers:

Roy Chan, Associate Professor, Chinese, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures

Andrew Way Leong, Assistant Professor, Department of English, UC Berkeley

- - - - -

Bioethics in the time of Black Lives Matter: A Black Feminist Perspective

Last summer saw the convergence of two major threats to public health: the COVID-19 pandemic and the enduring value gap between white and Black lives (referenced in the name of the protest movement Black Lives Matter). On April 8, 2021, the CDC released a statement naming racism as "a serious public health threat." By contrast, six weeks earlier, the Journal of the American Medical Association released a podcast (now withdrawn) in which the very existence of structural racism in medicine (by now a well-proven fact) was called into question. In this conversation, we will discuss how the CDC declaration might be translated into action within this larger social and political context and what Black feminist bioethicists can contribute to the ongoing conversation.

Thursday, May 27

4:30 p.m. - 5:10 p.m. (PST)

Speakers:

Camisha Russell, Assistant Professor, UO Department of Philosophy, University of Oregon

Yolonda Wilson, Associate Professor, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, Saint Louis University

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/09/21

Provost's Lecture Featuring Ibram X. Kendi
A Conversation About How To Be an Anti-Racist

April 14, 2021 from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. via Zoom. 
Free and open to the public.
Register Here

Join us on April 14, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. for a conversation with Ibram X. Kendi, today’s leading antiracist voice in America, historian, National Book Award winner (2019), Guggenheim Fellow, three-time New York Times best-selling author and journalist. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University, and the founding director of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. Kendi is the 2020-2021 Frances B. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.

He is the author of many books including "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America," which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and three #1 New York Times bestsellers: "How to Be an Antiracist;" "Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You," co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and "Antiracist Baby," illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky. His latest book, "Be Antiracist: A Journal for Awareness, Reflection, and Action," was released in October.

The Provost’s Lecture Series is a partnership of the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation to bring renowned thinkers, artists, designers and leaders to OSU to engage the community on topics of global significance. Visit the Provost’s Lecture Series website for information regarding future speakers.

 Please contact Andrea McDaniel in the Office of the Provost if you have any questions.  

 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 04/08/21

!!!DEADLINE EXTENDED!!!

Marion Ballew Thomas Indigenous, Race, and UO Ethnic Studies Scholarship


Application deadline: Monday, May 10th, 4:30pm


The Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies is offering either 2 scholarships of $500 each, or 1 scholarship of $1000. This funding will be awarded to culturally diverse, undergraduate Ethnic Studies majors or minors, or Native American Studies minors who are engaged in studies that further the development of their social awareness and analytical skills.
Preference will be given to students who:
Have demonstrated financial need for tuition/fees and or living expenses
Have a documented record of community service and engagement; OR
Are minoring/majoring in the natural sciences, the social sciences, peace studies, education, business or planning and public policy in addition to Ethnic Studies
APPLICATION PROCESS: Eligible students should submit:
- A short 2-3 page personal statement addressing their focus of study and relevant community work
- Transcripts (official or unofficial)
- One short letter of reference
Applications should be submitted digitally to the Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies Department at ethnic@uoregon.edu by 4:30pm, Monday, May 10th. Please use the subject line: 2021 Ballew Thomas Scholarship Submission: Your Name.
Students who apply but do not receive the scholarship this year, may apply again next year. Students who are awarded this scholarship may apply to renew it until they are awarded their UO undergraduate degrees. Any renewal granted is dependent upon funding available for scholarships and the number of all applicants.
Award winners will be announced by Friday, June 4th. Scholarship funding will be distributed before the end of Spring Term.
 
Give
Remember when you attended the university and wished there was more you could achieve but the finances weren’t always available? While the Ethnic Studies Department is growing and making a significant impact on students’ lives, our needs remain the same as when you were here. And, we want to improve.
We’d appreciate your help.
The Marion Ballew Thomas Memorial Scholarship Fund is one way you can make a positive difference for students following in your footsteps. This scholarship fund provides annual scholarships for undergraduate students engaged in studies furthering the development of their social awareness and analytical skills. Awarded to culturally diverse undergraduates who’ve declared their major or minor in Ethnic Studies or Native American Studies, preference will be given to students who need financial help with their tuition and/or who have documented community service and/or are minoring in natural sciences, social sciences, peace studies, education, business or planning and public policy.
You chose to make a difference when you selected Ethnic Studies as your principle area of study. Continue to make that difference by supporting your alma mater and its students, who, like you, also want to make a positive difference with their lives.
Please make a gift online at https://supportuo.uofoundation.org by entering ETHNIC STUDIES in the OTHER designation box, or respond with a “Yes!” when you receive a letter or phone call for the Annual Giving Program.
Thank you!
 
 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 03/19/21

 

Marion Ballew Thomas Indigenous, Race, and UO Ethnic Studies Scholarship

Application deadline: Wednesday, April 28th, 4:30pm

The Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies is offering either 2 scholarships of $500 each, or 1 scholarship of $1000. This funding will be awarded to culturally diverse, undergraduate Ethnic Studies majors or minors, or Native American Studies minors who are engaged in studies that further the development of their social awareness and analytical skills.

Preference will be given to students who:

  1. Have demonstrated financial need for tuition/fees and or living expenses
  2. Have a documented record of community service and engagement; OR
  3. Are minoring/majoring in the natural sciences, the social sciences, peace studies, education, business or planning and public policy in addition to Ethnic Studies

APPLICATION PROCESS: Eligible students should submit:

- A short 2-3 page personal statement addressing their focus of study and relevant community work

- Transcripts (official or unofficial)

- One short letter of reference

Applications should be submitted digitally to the Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies Department at ethnic@uoregon.edu by 4:30pm, Wednesday, April 28th. Please use the subject line: 2021 Ballew Thomas Scholarship Submission: Your Name.

Students who apply but do not receive the scholarship this year, may apply again next year. Students who are awarded this scholarship may apply to renew it until they are awarded their UO undergraduate degrees. Any renewal granted is dependent upon funding available for scholarships and the number of all applicants.

Award winners will be announced by Friday, May 21st. Scholarship funding will be distributed before the end of Spring Term.

 

Give

Remember when you attended the university and wished there was more you could achieve but the finances weren’t always available? While the Ethnic Studies Department is growing and making a significant impact on students’ lives, our needs remain the same as when you were here. And, we want to improve.

We’d appreciate your help.

The Marion Ballew Thomas Memorial Scholarship Fund is one way you can make a positive difference for students following in your footsteps. This scholarship fund provides annual scholarships for undergraduate students engaged in studies furthering the development of their social awareness and analytical skills. Awarded to culturally diverse undergraduates who’ve declared their major or minor in Ethnic Studies or Native American Studies, preference will be given to students who need financial help with their tuition and/or who have documented community service and/or are minoring in natural sciences, social sciences, peace studies, education, business or planning and public policy.

You chose to make a difference when you selected Ethnic Studies as your principle area of study. Continue to make that difference by supporting your alma mater and its students, who, like you, also want to make a positive difference with their lives.

Please make a gift online at https://supportuo.uofoundation.org by entering ETHNIC STUDIES in the OTHER designation box, or respond with a “Yes!” when you receive a letter or phone call for the Annual Giving Program.

Thank you!

 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 03/18/21

 

With Spring Break In Sight, There’s Socially Distanced Concerts, Movie Showings, Trivia Nights (And So Much More)

Please follow the Student Activities Board on Instagram @StudentActivitiesBoardUO; here you can find announcements about virtual events for UO students such as movie nights, bingo, trivia, visual arts events, speakers, and even virtual concerts!

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 03/08/21

 

The UO will present a performance of the play, Personal History by Dominic Taylor, beginning on March 10 and streaming through March 14. Here is a link to a synopsis of the play:

 

https://www.playscripts.com/play/162

 

Here is a link to watching the play from Broadway on Demand:

https://www.broadwayondemand.com/series/Kzq5p92kP9Q7-personal-history--university-of-oregon

 

The play will stream beginning March 10 -14. 

 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 02/24/21

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 02/10/21

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 02/02/21

Black History Month is celebrated every February as an homage to the achievements of African Americans who have shaped American history.The idea for a way to celebrate African American achievements started in 1915 by historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African American figures of his day.

This year Lane Community College's Black Student Union "Black History 365" is proud to present prominent African Historian Tony Browder. The theme for this Black History presentation is "Putting the African in Black History Month."

This event will be facilitated by Professor Mark Harris. We look forward to you all joining us on Thursday, February 18, 6;00-7:30pm (PST).  The event is free and open to the public.

For more information please contact Dr. Lawrence A. Rasheed - rasheedl@lanecc.edu  

Registration link:https://lanecc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_J3Fbl5obToamIL8QRkWzug

 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 02/01/21

The History and Future of Scientific Racism and Eugenics Panel Discussion

 Tuesday, February 16 at 1:00pm to 3:00pm

 Virtual Event

Register here for the free Zoom event. 

This panel will consider the enduring legacy of eugenics alongside the possibilities that genetic technologies now offer for understanding population histories, diverse and diasporic ancestries, and race- and gender-based health disparities.

Panelists:

Alexandra Minna Stern is a professor of history, American culture and women's and gender studies as well as associate dean for the humanities at the University of Michigan. She is the author of  Telling Genes: The Story of Genetic Counseling in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012) and Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination (Beacon, 2020). 

Jada Benn Torres is a associate professor of anthropology and the director for the Laboratory of Genetic Anthropology and Biocultural Studies at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Torres' research explores genetic ancestry and population history of African and Indigenous Caribbean peoples. She also studies women’s health disparities, with a specific focus on the uterine fibroids among women of African descent. Her most recent book is Genetic Ancestry: Our Stories, Our Pasts (Routledge, 2020).

Moderator: Judith Eisen, Professor of Biology and Wayne Morse Center Distinguished Scholar.

Commentary by Françoise Baylis, 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair. 

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as part of its Science, Policy, and the Public theme of inquiry. Cosponsored by University of Oregon Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies. 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 02/01/21

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 11/03/20

A message to students: Vote in the 2020 elections!

As the largest and most diverse generation alive right now, young people have a chance to make a real impact in our country if every eligible voter participates in the election. No matter what the outcome (or when we hear the final results) of the 2020 elections, we’ll have more people power to tackle any of the problems facing our country if we participate and engage. That starts with voting!

Here are some things to note for making sure your vote counts:

And finally, spread the word. Forward this email to your friends, text them to remind them to vote, and sharethis post on Facebook to tell people you’re voting.

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 10/15/20

UO IRES Grad Studies PhD Information Session - Friday, October 16th, 2020 @ 12 Noon:  

https://tinyurl.com/IRESInfosession

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 10/01/20

The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson (A Virtual Event) - Wednesday, October 7th @ 4 pm  


Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015) - (A Virtual Event) - Tuesday, October 20th @ 12 Noon  

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 09/28/20

The Forensics Department’s Mock Trial Program is recruiting for its Fall Season. This is a great opportunity for Ethnic Studies students to get involved at the University of Oregon, practice public speaking and critical thinking skills, and even prepare for law school. Many of UO Mock Trial's most successful members have been students pursuing a major or minor in this field. 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 09/15/2020

About National Voter Registration Day:
This fall, young people will be the largest and most diverse group of potential voters in the country, with their own values, ideas and issues that they care about. COVID-19 has created many challenges to voting, which is why it is important to do everything we can to help students register and turn out to vote on November 3rd.

As a premier partner, the Student PIRGs are working with our vote coalitions on campuses across the country to make sure National Voter Registration Day is a success by reaching all students on our campuses on September 22nd.

National Voter Registration Day is a non-partisan civic holiday celebrating democracy. It was first established in 2012 and has gained momentum since, including endorsements from the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS), the National Association of Election Officials and many more. The goal of the holiday is to ensure, by creating a broad awareness of voter registration, that tens of thousands of Americans who might otherwise miss the voter registration deadline are able to register to vote.

Over 3 Million voters have registered on National Voter Registration Day so far, including 1.3 Million in 2018-2019 alone, and this one is on track to be the biggest ever!
 

  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 09/15/2020

The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome 

Wednesday, October 7, 4:00 p.m.

Featuring Alondra Nelson, Institute for Advanced Study and Social Science Research Council. This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Register

Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015) 

Tuesday, October 20, Noon

This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. It's part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. It is cosponsored by the UO Political Science Department; the UO School of Law; the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion; and KLCC, public radio.Register

The State From Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities 

November 11, 4:00 p.m.

Featuring Vesla Weaver, Johns Hopkins University. This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. Register 

The Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics encourages civic engagement and inspires enlightened dialogue by bringing students, scholars, activists, policymakers, and communities together to discuss issues affecting Oregon, our nation, and the world. 

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  • DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 08/17/2020     

OREGON UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH JOURNAL FOR SUBMISSIONS AND EDITORS: 

They are currently looking for undergraduate research and cover art to publish in Fall 2020/Winter 2021. They are dedicated to featuring research papers from all academic disciplines and would love to see submissions from this department! They are additionally looking to recruit at least two more editors.

Upcoming deadline for manuscript submissions: September 21, 2020.

Applications to join the editorial board are accepted on a rolling basis.

Guidelines for submitting your work or applying to the board can be found at our website: https://blogs.uoregon.edu/ourj/

For more information, feel free to contact them at
ourj@uoregon.edu