Events

Oct 7
The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for...
October 7 4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event

Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. She was previously a professor of sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science.

Nelson began her academic career on the faculty of Yale University and there was recognized with several honors, including the Poorvu Prize for interdisciplinary teaching excellence. An award-winning sociologist, Nelson has published widely-acclaimed books and articles exploring science, technology, medicine, and social inequality.

Nelson is author of several books, including The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, a finalist for the Hurston-Wright Foundation Award for Nonfiction, and a Wall Street Journal favorite book.

Nelson has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality and about the social implications of new technologies, including artificial intelligence, big data, and human gene editing. She serves on the boards of the Data & Society Research Institute, the Center for Research Libraries, and The Teagle Foundation, as well as the board for African-American programs at Monticello. She also is a member of the board of directors of the Brotherhood/Sister Sol, a Harlem-based youth development organization. Her essays, reviews, and commentary have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Science, Le Nouvel Observateur, The Boston Globe, and on National Public Radio, The New Yorker Radio Hour, and PBS Newshour, among other venues. 

This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 

Oct 16
Book talk "Handiland: The Crippest Place on Earth"noon

Elizabeth A. Wheeler, English and Disability Studies, University of Oregon HandiLand looks at young adult novels, fantasy series, graphic memoirs, and picture books of the...
October 16 noon

Elizabeth A. Wheeler, English and Disability Studies, University of Oregon

HandiLand looks at young adult novels, fantasy series, graphic memoirs, and picture books of the last 25 years in which characters with disabilities take center stage for the first time. These books take what others regard as weaknesses—for instance, Harry Potter’s headaches or Hazel Lancaster’s oxygen tank—and redefine them as part of the hero’s journey. HandiLand places this movement from sidekick to hero in the political contexts of disability rights movements in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Ghana.

Elizabeth A. Wheeler, invokes the fantasy of HandiLand, an ideal society ready for young people with disabilities before they get there, as a yardstick to measure how far we’ve come and how far we still need to go toward the goal of total inclusion. The book moves through the public spaces young people with disabilities have entered, including schools, nature, and online communities. As a disabled person and parent of children with disabilities, Wheeler offers an inside look into families who collude with their kids in shaping a better world. Moving, funny, and beautifully written, HandiLand: The Crippest Place on Earth is the definitive study of disability in contemporary literature for young readers.

Oct 16
Decolonizing the University: SHL and UO Library Faculty Bring Oregon Latinx History into the Classroom Through Exploration of the PCUN Archivesnoon

  For the zoom link please contact David Wacks wacks@uoregon.edu   This presentation by Senior Instructors of Spanish Heather Quarles and Kelley...
October 16 noon–1:00 p.m.

 

For the zoom link please contact David Wacks wacks@uoregon.edu

 

This presentation by Senior Instructors of Spanish Heather Quarles and Kelley León-Howarth  models one component of the RL SHL Critical Language Awareness (CLA) curriculum. Classes held in the the Special Collections section of the Knight Library employ the Pineros y Campesinos Unidos (PCUN) Archive to decolonize academic language and space and serve as academic mentorship imbedded into the course curriculum. The content prioritizes Latinx communities in Oregon and teaches about a successful local resistance movement still active today.

 

Originally from the midwest, Kelley León Howarth graduated with a B.A. in French and English from the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire in 1995. She completed her M.A. in Romance Languages at the University of Oregon in Spanish and French in 2002. Since that time, she has been teaching Spanish at the UO, specifically language and culture classes at the 2nd and 3rd year-level. She co-designed and taught SPAN 308 Comunidades bilingües in 2011, and has been part of the creation of the Spanish Heritage Language Program in RL since then. Her approach to language teaching has been radically impacted by learning about and putting into practice heritage pedagodgies that center on critical language awareness.  Recent awards include the 2018 P.A.T.O.S. Award from the  Division of Equity and Inclusion of UO, the Tykeson Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching from the College of Arts and Sciences in 2017, and the 2015 UO Equity Innovation Award, Division of Equity and Inclusion, which she received along with the other  members of the Spanish Heritage Language Working Group.

 

A first-generation college student in her family and an Oregonian by birth, Heather Quarles completed both her undergraduate studies in Spanish and Italian and her graduate work in Spanish here at the University of Oregon. This is her 17th year teaching Spanish in the Romance Languages Department of the UO. She has extensive experience teaching all the first and second-year Spanish courses, including co-developing the Spanish Heritage Language Program courses Spanish 218 and 228. Additionally she teaches several of the courses that introduce upper division Spanish, including Identidades Hispanas, Expresiones Artísticas and Comunidades Bilingües. Since becoming involved in developing the heritage language program, Heather has incorporated HL pedagogical practices in all her courses. One example is her recent project with the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the EMU Permanent Public Art Collection and the 20x21 Eugene mural project where classwork is taken outside the classroom and the concept of academic topics, spaces and language are problematized with questions of access, relevance and privilege. Heather is on the Steering Committee of the Dreamers Working Group that won the UO Martin Luther King Group Award for Institutional Transformation this past academic year. And she is equally proud of her Award for Outstanding Service and Contribution to United Academics for her work as a union officer and steward starting in 2014. 

Oct 20
Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015)noon

Register for this free event   A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical...
October 20 noon

Register for this free event  

A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical issues at the intersection of law and policy. He served in the Obama Administration as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009 to 2015), the third longest serving Attorney General in U.S. history and the first African American to hold that office. A staunch advocate for civil rights and voting rights, Holder is active in gerrymandering reform as Chair of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee. He is a partner at Covington & Burling LLP, in Washington, D.C. 

This event the keynote for the Wayne Morse Center's 20th Anniversary Celebration and is sponsored by the Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. It's part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. It is cosponsored by the UO Political Science Department; the UO School of Law; the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion; and KLCC, public radio.

Oct 23
“In the Hands of God: Evangelical Therapeutics and Migrant Faith among Brazilians in the U.S.”noon

Johanna Bard Richlin, Anthropology, University of Oregon Johanna Bard Richlin considers the explosive rise of evangelicalism among Latin American migrants in the United States....
October 23 noon

Johanna Bard Richlin, Anthropology, University of Oregon

Johanna Bard Richlin considers the explosive rise of evangelicalism among Latin American migrants in the United States. She addresses this fundamental question: why do individuals become more devoutly evangelical as migrants in the United States, and how does this identity alter their self understanding?

 

Oct 29
Facts Still Matter: Countering the Influence of Russian Hackers, Trolls, and “Viral Deception"4:00 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org.  Register...
October 29 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org. 

Register for this free event

This talk is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics’ Public Affairs Speaker Series and the Center for Science Communication Research (SCR). It is made possible in part by the Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture Fund.  

Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the university’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the Association of American Publishers’ 2019 R.R. Hawkins Award and was published in a revised paperback edition by Oxford University Press in June 2020. Among her other award-winning books are Spiral of Cynicism (with Joseph Cappella) and The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (with Kate Kenski and Bruce Hardy). In 2020, the National Academy of Sciences awarded Jamieson its Public Welfare Medal for her “non-partisan crusade to ensure the integrity of facts in public discourse and development of the science of scientific communication to promote public understanding of complex issues.”

In 2003, Jamieson cofounded FactCheck.org, the non-profit non-partisan website that describes itself as a "consumer advocate for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics." In 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, and from 2014-2019, FactCheck won Webby Awards from the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences for being the best Politics site (the Webbys have been called the “Oscars of the Internet”).

Jamieson is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. For her contributions to the study of political communication, she received the American Political Science Association’s Murray Edelman Distinguished Career Award in 1995. In 2016, the American Philosophical Society awarded her its Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities.

Nov 6
Book Talk "Beauty Diplomacy: Embodying an Emerging Nation"noon

Oluwakemi (Kemi) M. Balogun is Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and African Studies at the University of Oregon Even as beauty...
November 6 noon

Oluwakemi (Kemi) M. Balogun is Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and African Studies at the University of Oregon

Even as beauty pageants have been critiqued as misogynistic and dated cultural vestiges of the past in the US and elsewhere, the pageant industry is growing in popularity across the Global South, and Nigeria is one of the countries at the forefront of this trend. In a country with over 1,000 reported pageants, these events are more than superficial forms of entertainment. Beauty Diplomacy takes us inside the world of Nigerian beauty contests to see how they are transformed into contested vehicles for promoting complex ideas about gender and power, ethnicity and belonging, and a rapidly changing articulation of Nigerian nationhood. Drawing on four case studies of beauty pageants, this book examines how Nigeria's changing position in the global political economy and existing cultural tensions inform varied forms of embodied nationalism, where contestants are expected to integrate recognizable elements of Nigerian cultural identity while also conveying a narrative of a newly-emerging, globally-relevant Nigeria. Oluwakemi M. Balogun critically examines Nigerian pageants in the context of major transitions within the nation-state, using these events as a lens through which to understand Nigerian national identity and international relations.

 

Nov 11
The State From Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University....
November 11 4:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Register for this free event

Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research aims to better understand the causes and consequences of racial inequality in the United States, how state policies and institutions shape political life and identity, and especially the effects of increasing punishment and surveillance in America on democratic inclusion.

Weaver has served on the Harvard/NIJ Executive Session on Community Corrections, the Center for Community Change’s Good Jobs for All initiative, and the APSA Presidential Taskforce on Racial Inequality in the Americas.  In 2017, she was an Andrew Carnegie Fellow. She is currently working on a new book based on the Portals Policing Project.  

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. 

Register for the Zoom webinar here

Nov 13
“The End of Modernity: Temporalities of Nation, Indigeneity, and the Anthropocene in the Contemporary Independent Cinema of the Philippines”noon

Elio Garcia, PhD candidate, English; and 2020-21 OHC Dissertation Fellow
November 13 noon

Elio Garcia, PhD candidate, English; and 2020-21 OHC Dissertation Fellow

Nov 18
Data Ethics Conversation Series: Data and Us: Forms, Algorithms and the Data Subject11:00 a.m.

Speaker: Colin Koopman, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Oregon. Register: https://ramonalvarado.net/data-ethics-conversation-series-2020/
November 18 11:00 a.m.

Speaker: Colin Koopman, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Oregon.

Register: https://ramonalvarado.net/data-ethics-conversation-series-2020/

Nov 19
Climate Justice lecture: “Climate Change in the American Mind”5:00 p.m.

What are the psychological, cultural, and political reasons why some people passionately engage with issues surrounding climate change, while others are apathetic, and some are...
November 19 5:00 p.m.

What are the psychological, cultural, and political reasons why some people passionately engage with issues surrounding climate change, while others are apathetic, and some are downright dismissive and hostile?

Anthony Leiserowitz, the founder and Director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC) and a Senior Research Scientist at the Yale School of the Environment, will explore this question as he delivers the 2020-21 Kritikos lecture “Climate Change in the American Mind” on Thursday, November 19, 2020 at 5 p.m. via Zoom. His talk will be the first in the OHC’s 2020-21 Climate Justice series.

Climate change is one of the most daunting challenges of our time. Americans have diverse and sometimes opposing views about global warming, fundamentally shaping the political climate of climate change. Leiserowitz will explain recent trends in Americans’ climate change knowledge, attitudes, policy support, and behavior and discuss strategies to build public and political will for climate action.

Leiserowitz is an expert on public climate change and environmental beliefs, attitudes, policy preferences, and behavior, and the psychological, cultural, and political factors that shape them. At Yale, Leiserowitz examines how Americans and others around the world respond to the issues of climate change and other global challenges. YPCCC seeks to discover what people understand and misunderstand about the causes, consequences, and solutions of climate change; how they perceive the risks; and what kinds of policies they support or oppose.

As he explains, Leiserowitz’s research with YPCCC “suggest[s] it is possible to improve public understanding of the scientific consensus on climate change in a way that does not trigger political polarization. In particular, our findings suggest that scientists, nonprofit organizations, and policy makers should communicate the scientific consensus using short, simple declarative sentences or simple pie charts. Ultimately, better communication of the scientific consensus on human-caused climate change can contribute to improved public understanding and engagement with the issue.”

According to Leiserowitz, despite the distraction of COVID-19, climate change is “not fading from people’s memories, it is not fading from their sense of importance just because other issues have arisen.”

Leiserowitz earned both his MS (1998) and PhD (2003) in Environmental Studies from the University of Oregon. He studied with Paul Slovic, professor of Psychology and president of Decision Research (DR), with whom he currently serves at DR. He conducts research at the global, national, and local scales, including many surveys of the American public. He conducted the first global study of public values, attitudes, and behaviors regarding sustainable development and has published more than 200 scientific articles, chapters, and reports. Leiserowitz and his colleague Edward Maibach (George Mason University) are winners of the 2020 Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication. In addition, he is the host of Climate Connections, a radio program broadcast each day on more than 600 stations nationwide.

Leiserowitz’s lecture is free and open to the public. Registration is required to participate in the live Zoom event. Register at: ohc.uoregon.edu. The talk will be recorded and available for viewing on the OHC’s YouTube channel. For more information contact ohc@uoregon.edu.

Nov 20
“The Longest Resistance: Anti-Fascist Women between Franco and Hitler”noon

Gina Herrmann, Romance Languages, University of Oregon "The Longest Resistance: Anti-Fascist Women between Franco and Hitler" is a lecture about Spanish and Catalan...
November 20 noon

Gina Herrmann, Romance Languages, University of Oregon

"The Longest Resistance: Anti-Fascist Women between Franco and Hitler" is a lecture about Spanish and Catalan women whose struggle against fascism began earlier and lasted longer than that of any of their continental comrades. To tell their story, Gina Herrmann has analyzed the oral histories of these women, in which they recount and grapple with their struggles during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), their fight against Franco’s dictatorship during and after World War II, their involvement in the French Resistance, and for some, their battle against Nazism. She contextualizes the experiences they relate by drawing on research on women survivors of the Holocaust and on the dirty wars and regimes of torture in Latin America. Women survivors in European narratives have been reluctant or unable to speak about what they endured; by comparing the experiences of other groups of women, Herrmann has been able to cross national, temporal, and geographic boundaries to examine the coercion, extortion, terror, and torture that women political prisoners have faced under various fascist regimes.

 

Dec 4
“Amplifying Voices: Auditory Texts in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945”noon

"Amplifying Voices: Auditory Texts in Colonial Korea (1910-45)" attends to the junction between sound and literature in focusing on works written for radio broadcast...
December 4 noon

"Amplifying Voices: Auditory Texts in Colonial Korea (1910-45)" attends to the junction between sound and literature in focusing on works written for radio broadcast from the Japanese Colonial Period. Yadam is a compound word consisting of Chinese characters “unofficial” and “talk” which can be translated into English as “anecdotes,” “miscellany” or even “historical romance.” Although yadam as an oral and written literary genre has longer origins and history that goes back to the Chosŏn dynasty (1392-1905), what interests me in this study is its remanifestation through new media, such as newspapers, magazines, and radio broadcasting, in the early twentieth century. I will demonstrate the relationship between yadam as a traditional literary narrative that has oral origins and its remediazation through the advent of the microphone and radio which ironically facilitated oral storytelling contests making Korean language and tradition more audible therefore often serving a kind of learning purpose for the Korean listeners, who at this time were Japanese colonial subjects living under Japanese language soundscape.

Jina Kim, East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Oregon

Dec 8
Climate Justice lecture: “The Geography of Injustice and the Ecology of Reparations”5:00 p.m.

How can centuries of environmental exploitation and social injustice in the U.S. be unraveled? Robin Morris Collin, the Norma Paulus Professor of Law at Willamette University...
December 8 5:00 p.m.

How can centuries of environmental exploitation and social injustice in the U.S. be unraveled? Robin Morris Collin, the Norma Paulus Professor of Law at Willamette University College of Law, will share her passion for creating solutions to remedy environmental injustice. She will deliver the 2020-21 Colin Ruagh O’Fallon Memorial lecture “The Geography of Injustice and the Ecology of Reparations” on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 at 5 p.m. via Zoom.

Collin asserts that, driven by the legacies of colonialism and slavery, U.S. public policy has deliberately subordinated nature and people in pursuit of profit by discounting the value of people and places into commodities for transactional exchange. Our economy, which relies on patterns of extraction, consumption, and pollution, has deeply harmed the earth and its people. Poor communities, especially communities of color, are disproportionately impacted by pollution, waste disposal, hazardous sites, resource depletion, and disasters in the natural and built environment.

To visualize how people and places are affected by environmental injustice, Collin has been utilizing the EPA’s EJSCREEN: Environmental Justice Screening and Mapping Tool, which collects and analyzes information to assess and compare environmental and human health risks borne by populations identified by race, national origin, or income. Injustice has literally been mapped.

Beyond defining the problems, Collin will outline key strategies that can lead to healing. She contends that in order to heal we must reestablish a reciprocity between ourselves and nature, and we need to center environmental justice in the heart of sustainability. To that end, Collin maintains that environmental justice must be included in the core curriculum so all will understand why equity matters. We must reexamine our shared histories and recognize the truth of where we are now—not try to deny or disguise it. She also believes that injured communities and damaged places need to be reconnected, one by one.

Collin believes that reparations can change the ecology of subordination, but not with payments—payments will not change systems. Sustainable community-based projects create new systems that bolster relationships between people and the land—like the Southeastern African American Farmers’ Organic Network which is committed to culturally relevant, ancestrally guided, and ecologically sustainable, agricultural-based living. Healing entails a community-by-community focus on restorations, reparations, and re-creations.

Collin, the first U.S. law professor to teach sustainability courses in a U.S. law school, currently teaches Global Sustainability. Prior to her tenure at Willamette University, she was a professor at the University of Oregon’s Law School from 1993 to 2003. While at the UO, she cofounded the Coalition Against Environmental Racism’s Environmental Justice conference and the Sustainable Business Symposium, both of which continue into their second decade.

She has been awarded the David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award from the UO’s Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, the 2012 Oregon Woman of Achievement Award, the Leadership in Sustainability Award from the Oregon State Bar, the Campus Compact Faculty Award for Civic Engagement in Sustainability, and the national Environmental Justice Achievement Award from the Environmental Protection Agency for her work with the Oregon Environmental Justice Task Force. She was a founding board member of the Environmental Justice Action Group of Portland, and a founding member of Lawyers for a Sustainable Future.

Collin’s talk is free and open to the public. Registration is required to participate in the live Zoom event. Register at: ohc.uoregon.edu. The talk will be recorded and available for viewing on the OHC’s YouTube channel. For more information contact ohc@uoregon.edu

Dec 9
Data Ethics Conversation Series: Data Science in Scientific Inquiry, Philosophical issues11:00 a.m.

Speaker: Sabina Leonelli (University of Exeter) Register: https://ramonalvarado.net/data-ethics-conversation-series-2020/
December 9 11:00 a.m.

Speaker: Sabina Leonelli (University of Exeter)

Register: https://ramonalvarado.net/data-ethics-conversation-series-2020/