Events

May 12
LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act.12:00 a.m.

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common...
January 27–June 14

Every year, the JSMA partners with the University of Oregon’s Common Reading—campuswide programming around a shared book and its themes—to organize a Common Seeing exhibition that explores and expands on the Common Reading through visual art. The 2020-21 novel is This is My America by UO Assistant Vice Provost for Advising, Kimberly Johnson. The Common Reading’s charge of Listen. Learn. Act. incorporates different bodies of work across multiple platforms, focusing on Blackness, Black experience, and dismantling racism. The works on view in this year’s Common Seeing, on loan from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, are by Black American artists Hank Willis Thomas (American, b. 1976) and Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Their art compels us to look, listen, learn, and act.

The JSMA believes that art can move people to change. As an academic art museum, it is critical for us to listen, learn, and act in order to build trust and understanding. We are committed to the advancement of anti-racism in museum culture and diverse and equitable approaches in our work. The JSMA’s exhibitions and public programs strive to amplify multiple perspectives, experiences, and voices. LOOK. Listen. Learn. Act. is generously made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation.

 

Image: Alison Saar (American, b. 1956). Sorrow’s Kitchen (detail), 2020. Wood, tin, acrylics, spray tar, ceiling tin and linoleum, 28 x 12 x 10 in. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer (Photo Credit: L.A. Louver).  

 

May 12
Researching Experiences of Uncertainty and Collective Carenoon

Please join the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies for the 2021 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Colloquium on researching experiences of uncertainty and...
May 12 noon–1:00 p.m.

Please join the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies for the 2021 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Colloquium on researching experiences of uncertainty and collective care with CLLAS Summer Grant recipients Polet Campos-Melchor and Lola Loustaunau!

Polet Campos-Melchor (Anthropology), "El Noa Noa: Strategies of Love and Care at the U.S.- México Border"

Lola Loustaunau (Sociology), "From disposability to Collective Care: Experiences of Migrant Essential Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic"

This is a remote event and will take place over Zoom. To join the CLLAS email list and receive Zoom login information, please email us at cllas@uoregon.edu or subscribe here.

May 12
Omaris Zamora: Delectable Complicities From El Ni’ E: AfroLatinx Feminisms of Cardi B & La Bella Chanel 3:30 p.m.

Omaris Zamora, Assistant Professor of Latino and Caribbean Studies and Africana Studies, Rugers University, will speak on Afro-Latinx feminisms.
May 12 3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Omaris Zamora, Assistant Professor of Latino and Caribbean Studies and Africana Studies, Rugers University, will speak on Afro-Latinx feminisms.

May 13
Kathryn C. Montgomery: “Understanding and Regulating the Commercial Surveillance System”noon

Kathryn C. Montgomery is Professor Emerita School of Communication at American University. Her research examines the role of media in society, the politics of entertainment...
May 13 noon–1:00 p.m.

Kathryn C. Montgomery is Professor Emerita School of Communication at American University. Her research examines the role of media in society, the politics of entertainment television, youth engagement with digital media, advertising and marketing practices, and the future of digital media in the era of big data. Montgomery is also Research Director and Senior Strategist for the Center for Digital Democracy.

Co-presented with Jeff Chester, Former Investigative Reporter & Filmmaker, and Executive Director of the Center for Digital Democracy.

Free registration required.

 

Series Overview

What is Communication? (2021) will investigate instantiations and permutations of communication via models of exchange, modes of inquiry, and meanings of community. While communication has been conceptualized as models of transportation, transmission, and ritual communication is also characterized by modes of sharing, imparting, connecting, and participating. These characteristics can contribute to democracy, as well as facilitating the commons and community/fellowship. This year marks the sixth collaboration with scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences and arts.

Please see whatis.uoregon.edu for more details and other featured keynotes.

The What is…? Speaker Series is sponsored by the Knight Chair in Communication Research, UO Women in Graduate Science, the Oregon Humanities Center, New Media and Culture Program, and the Department of Philosophy. Additional gratitude to our supporters.

May 13
School of Languages and Global Studies Seminar: Jun Lang2:00 p.m.

Straight man cancer and little fresh meat: female discursive empowerment in Chinese social media. With the boom of networked digital communication, verbal misogyny permeates...
May 13 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Straight man cancer and little fresh meat: female discursive empowerment in Chinese social media.

With the boom of networked digital communication, verbal misogyny permeates Chinese social media, reflecting and reinforcing sexism in the larger gender order (Jing-Schmidt & Peng 2018). At the same time, a new generation of Chinese women are seizing digital platforms to counterstrike misogyny and patriarchal authority in gender discourse warfare (Lang 2020). They coined the label ‘straight man cancer’ to refer to men who harbor misogynistic views toward women, condemning male privilege. They also created the label ‘little fresh meat’ to refer to an alternative, effeminate type of masculinity, expressing an anti-macho aesthetic and rhetoric through linguistically sexualizing men.

This study uses corpus data from social media, supplemented with survey data on the perceptions of the social meaning of these labels. The corpus finding shows that ‘straight man cancer’ is more often collocated with words showing emotional negativity while the collocates of ‘little fresh meat’ are relatively positive. The survey data on female language user perceptions shows that ‘straight man cancer’ is perceived significantly more negative than ‘little fresh meat’ (X2 = 168.62, p <.001), converging with the corpus finding.

I argue that the creation of these labels demonstrates a newly awakened sense of discursive empowerment of Chinese women, giving women a voice in gender discourse where they challenge the traditional model of masculinity supported by patriarchal authority. This study has implications for both gender research and social actions toward gender equality.

Jun Lang is a PhD candidate at the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures. Her research interests include language and gender, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics, and second language acquisition. This study is a part of a work-in-progress dissertation project that explores women’s roles in gender discourse in post-reform China.

 

To register for this event and receive a zoom link: https://uoregon.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEocOqrrDgqGdEqHbLi-ledb-4CUuscHwEX

May 13
Conversations About Our World Talk Series: Identity, Ambivalence, Homecoming: Travels Between Asian and Asian American Studies5:00 p.m.

This conversation explores the relationship between Asian studies and Asian American studies, reflecting on both the commonalities as well as distinctions between these endeavors....
May 13 5:00 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

This conversation explores the relationship between Asian studies and Asian American studies, reflecting on both the commonalities as well as distinctions between these endeavors. Each of these fields bears a distinct disciplinary orientation—Asian studies derive from Cold War-era area studies and Asian American studies from activist-inspired ethnic studies. How can these different perspectives be brought together productively? Moreover, in an atmosphere of fear caused by the pandemic, racial hostility often blurs the distinctions between "Asian" and “Asian American." How can this moment of common vulnerability renew dialogues between these two fields in a continued endeavor to articulate global justice?

Speakers:


Roy Chan, Associate Professor, Chinese, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures
Andrew Way Leong, Assistant Professor, Department of English, UC Berkeley


Join University of Oregon faculty, Dr. Arafaat A. Valiani (Associate Professor, History | Sociology | Global Health), Dr. Sangita Gopal (Associate Professor, Cinema Studies), and Dr. Bish Sen (Associate Professor, School of Journalism and Communication) for a speakers series during spring term 2021. All events will be held virtually and feature conversations between faculty and speakers from the University of Oregon community and beyond. Topics include Indigenous arts, global communications after Covid, and identity in Asian and Asian Studies, and more.

Sponsors

Asian Studies Program
Center for Asian and Pacific Studies
Center for the Study of Women in Society
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Anthropology
Department of History
Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies
Department of Sociology
Global Health Program
Global Studies Institute, Division of Global Engagement
Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities

May 14
Cinema Studies Presents: Screening of 'Swallow'12:00 a.m.

Students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to a free virtual screening of Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow (2019), available for viewing from May 14 to...
May 14–19

Students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to a free virtual screening of Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow (2019), available for viewing from May 14 to 19. Produced by Mollye Asher, Swallow was an official selection at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival and won Best Actress at the festival.

May 14 to 19
Free and open to the community
Advance registration required

The free screening of Swallow will be made available online through the Eventive streaming platform and requires advance registration. Registrations are limited to the first 150 viewers on a first-come, first-served basis. Once you have pre-ordered (registered) successfully, the film will be accessible from 7:00 pm (PDT) on Friday, May 14, 2021 to 6:59 pm (PDT) on Wednesday, May 19, 2021. After you “unlock” the film, you will have 72 hours to finish watching. For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

TW // Self Harm, Eating Disorder

Swallow (2019)

Directed by Carlo Mirabella-Davis | Produced by Mollye Asher | 94 Minutes | Rated R
2019 Tribeca Film Festival Official Selection and Winner of Best Actress Award

Film Synopsis: On the surface, Hunter (Haley Bennett) appears to have it all. A newly pregnant housewife, she seems content to spend her time tending to an immaculate home and doting on her Ken-doll husband, Richie (Austin Stowell). However, as the pressure to meet her controlling in-laws and husband’s rigid expectations mounts, cracks begin to appear in her carefully created facade. Hunter develops a dangerous habit, and a dark secret from her past seeps out in the form of a disorder called pica - a condition that has her compulsively swallowing inedible, and oftentimes life-threatening, objects. A provocative and squirm-inducing psychological thriller, SWALLOW follows one woman’s unraveling as she struggles to reclaim independence in the face of an oppressive system by whatever means possible.

Live, Remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher

On Wednesday, May 19th at 4pm (PDT), join us for a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film and share how a producer supports a director’s vision. Visit cinema.uoregon.edu for more information on how to join the Q&A.

 

Mollye Asher is a Gotham Award-Winning producer and recipient of the 2020 Independent Spirit Producers Award. Most recently, she produced Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), which won Best Director and Best Picture Drama at the 2021 Golden Globe Awards, the Golden Lion Award for Best Film at the 2020 Venice Film Festival, and many other honors. Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, with special attention given to the performance of Frances McDormand. 

Asher also produced Zhao’s The Rider (2017), which premiered at the Cannes Directors Fortnight and won its top prize. The Rider went on to be nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards, including Best Picture, and won Best Feature at the 2018 Gotham Awards. In addition, Asher produced Zhao’s debut feature Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015); Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow  (2019), which won Best Actress at the Tribeca Film Festival; Fort Tilden (2014) by writer/director team Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers; and Anja Marquardt’s Spirit Award nominated She's Lost Control (2014). Asher recently co-founded the production company The Population, which is currently in post-production on Josef Kubota Wladyka’s thriller Catch the Fair One. Asher earned her MFA from NYU’s graduate film program and is a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

This series is funded by the generous Harlan J. Strauss Visiting Filmmaker Endowment.

Thank you to our cosponsors:

Asian Studies Program, Department of Art, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Department of German and Scandinavian, Department of History, Department of Romance Languages, Department of Theatre Arts, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship, Native American Studies, School of Journalism and Communication/Media Studies, School of Music and Dance.

May 14
“Sacred Traces: Composers, Relics, and Art-Religion in Practice”noon

Abigail Fine, Musicology, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow This book project examines late nineteenth-century art-religion (Kunstreligion) in...
May 14 noon

Abigail Fine, Musicology, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow

This book project examines late nineteenth-century art-religion (Kunstreligion) in practice, as devotees to German and Austrian composers repurposed aspects of Christian religion to cultivate a new intimacy with the absent celebrity body. Devotees, encouraged by the sacred rhetoric employed by arts institutions like museums and music societies, treated composers as saints by collecting relics, flocking to historic houses as pilgrims, and envisioning famous deathbeds as apotheoses. When institutions encouraged devotees to form parasocial relationships with composers, they ensured the longevity of canons that remain a fixture in concert halls and curricula. 

May 14
Food Talk: Food Sovereignty, Agroecology, and Climate Change in Rajasthan, Indianoon

In Rajasthan, India, food insecurity is growing more pervasive as uneven socioeconomic transformations compound with climate change. This combination of forces has resulted in...
May 14 noon–1:00 p.m.

In Rajasthan, India, food insecurity is growing more pervasive as uneven socioeconomic transformations compound with climate change. This combination of forces has resulted in significant degradation in local farming knowledge, adding strain to an already precarious food system. While climate change in Rajasthan affects all farmers and their agriculture systems, small producers who belong to marginalized castes and tribes bear the brunt of its impacts. In recognition of the need for alternatives, grassroots movements and local NGOs are mobilizing around concepts of food sovereignty and agroecology as they try to re-negotiate the political, economic, and environmental process of agricultural development.

Based on four months of ethnographic fieldwork, Michelle Nikfarjam’s project explores this re-negotiation happening on the ground and how agro-ecological farming can build more socially equitable and environmentally sustainable conditions for small and marginalized producers. She highlights the specific contours of agro-ecological practice among the farmers she worked with and the implications of these practices in broader disruptions to the industrialization and financialization of agriculture in Rajasthan and globally.

She also examines the interplay of multilateral funding, government schemes and policy, and local movements and actions to understand what configurations best lead to a sustainable balance between agroecosystems and social systems. Her findings suggest that while grassroots movements have gained significant strides in fostering local solutions, farmers still face significant structural barriers in gender, caste, and class as they negotiate how interventions from the state and from local organizations are interwoven with their own concerns for stability and livelihood.

With her presentation, she hopes to show the incredible work being done to bring about more sustainable and equitable agricultural systems by her partner organization, CECOEDECON, farmers’ movements, and NGOs across northern India.

We will gather together for informal conversation at 11:45am with the presentation at noon and a Q&A to follow. A recording of the talk will be posted to the UO Food Studies Facebook page and YouTube channel after the event.

This event is cosponsored by the UO Department of Global Studies.

Register for the event at https://uoregon.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIkd-igqTwoEtYaCa2fwWIPN6wkoEfHgWBP.

Michelle Nikfarjam is a farmer-activist and scholar-in-training. She obtained her B.S. in Sustainable Food and Farming from the University of Massachusetts where she worked for three seasons as an organic production farmer and coordinated several food justice and agroecology projects in Amherst, MA. She went on to receive her M.A in International Studies from the University of Oregon where she conducted research on climate, agrarian change, food sovereignty and agroecology in India. She is now serving as an Emerson National Hunger Fellow with the Congressional Hunger Center. Starting in the fall, Michelle will join the University of Vermont’s Food Systems program as a Ph.D. student where she will continue her research in the arenas of food sovereignty and agroecology while working with farmers in the Middle East.

In her work, she believes it is important to employ decolonial and feminist political ecology frameworks approached through the intersectional relationship of class, race, gender, and the enviroment. As a scholar-activist, she is interested in how participatory action research (PAR) can be used to build farmers’ production capacities, foster more sustainable and equitable approaches to agriculture, and fully engage communities in the co-production of knowledge for food system transformation.

Photographs courtesy of Michelle Nikfarjam.

May 18
Conoce Tu Comunidad4:00 p.m.

This is an informal discussion space for Latinx/Hispanic communities and allies to connect, share stories of resiliency, and provide mentorship and support for you to...
April 20–May 25

This is an informal discussion space for Latinx/Hispanic communities and allies to connect, share stories of resiliency, and provide mentorship and support for you to succeed!

Week 4, April 20th – Financial Wellness
Learn why financial wellness is important, what a college student can do now to gain the requisite financial knowledge to be financially successful long-term.

Week 6, May 4 – Connecting with Student Leaders and Campus Resources
Get to know campus groups and Latinx/Hispanic students who are involved and how you can do it too.

Week 8, May 18 – Persisting and Developing Mental Toughness
Join us in sharing stories of persistence and the college experience, learn how to succeed academically, and develop mental toughness.

Week 9, May 25 – Registration Lab for Latinx/Hispanic students

Join on Zoom using your uoregon account: https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/92969074799?pwd=Zm5tazdYOWpidEI5NkVGQjExdjZMQT09

For any questions contact Karla Perez-Young at kperezy2@uoregon.edu

May 19
Oregon Diversity Career Symposium1:00 p.m.

It's time to OWN YOUR STORY!  You're invited to the 2021 Oregon Diversity Career Symposium (ODCS). Join with hundreds of University of...
May 19 1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

It's time to OWN YOUR STORY! 

You're invited to the 2021 Oregon Diversity Career Symposium (ODCS). Join with hundreds of University of Oregon and Oregon State University students for a half-day of interactive workshops, alumni panels, keynote speaker, and networking opportunities that have been intentionally designed to help prepare and inspire students with marginalized identities on your path from college to career. While all students are invited to attend, our goal is to create a space that especially empowers you to explore your identities and experiences within your job search process and development. Mark your calendars & register early for special giveaways from our AWESOME sponsors!

The Program

The event will be held virtually on the Remo platform. (Remo information will be sent to you the week of the event, for now just register in Handshake!)


1:00 p.m.: Keynote: Chabre Vickers, Vice President Community Development Officer, Wells Fargo & Company in Oregon and Southwest Washington
2:15 p.m.: Workshops 1 and 2

Soul Force for the Workforce: Wu Tang, Wu Wei and the Innerworkings of the We and the Way through Networking
 What Do I Want, Why Do I Want It, and What Am I Worth? Understanding How My Ethnic/Racial Identity Impact Career Decision-Making and Career Success


3:15 p.m.: Workshops 3 and 4

Your Identity, Your Career: Understanding Identity and Inclusion Branding
Anatomy of a Job Offer


4:15 p.m.: Alumni Panels

Being True to YOU and Navigating Imposter Syndrome
Networking and Relationship Building


5:00 p.m.: ODCS After Party Networking Hour with Alumni and Employers from 30+ companies

Video chat with representatives to find out about their company, what it’s like to work there, and job and internship opportunities. Did we mention special giveaways/doorprizes for students who stay for the whole networking hour!




 

To see a full schedule with detailed descriptions of each workshop and panel, speaker bios, and a list of sponsors who are proud to support your professional growth, explore career.uoregon.edu/odcs 

May 19
Native Studies Colloquium: "Earth Matters on Stage"3:30 p.m.

Book Talk: Earth Matters on Stage: Ecology, Environment and American Theatre. Theresa May, Department of Theater Arts, University of Oregon   Earth Matters on...
May 19 3:30 p.m.

Book Talk: Earth Matters on Stage: Ecology, Environment and American Theatre.

Theresa May, Department of Theater Arts, University of Oregon

 

Earth Matters on Stage (Routledge 2020) maps how theater in the US has reflected and responded to the nation’s environmental history during the 20th century. Beginning with plays and performances that forwarded the ecological violence of settler colonialism, through the important role of grassroots theater and the arts during the civil rights movements, to the present era of climate justice, the book argues that theater is a crucial tool of democracy, a place to embody the stories of relation that carry us toward a just, compassionate, and sustainable society. Or, as dramatist Monique Mojica (Kuna/Rappahannock) writes, a place to “spin possible worlds into being.” 

Theresa May is Associate Professor in the Department of Theater Arts at the University of Oregon.  In addition to this book, she is author of Salmon Is Everything: Community-Based Theatre in the Klamath Watershed and Greening Up Our Houses: A Guide to an Ecologically Sound Theatre.

May 19
Cinema Studies Presents: Q&A with Mollye Asher, Producer of 'Swallow'4:00 p.m.

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are invited to a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film, Swallow, and share how a producer...
May 19 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are invited to a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film, Swallow, and share how a producer supports a director’s vision. Visit cinema.uoregon.edu for more information on how to join the Q&A.

Free and open to the community.

Mollye Asher is a Gotham Award-Winning producer and recipient of the 2020 Independent Spirit Producers Award. Most recently, she produced Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), which won Best Director and Best Picture Drama at the 2021 Golden Globe Awards, the Golden Lion Award for Best Film at the 2020 Venice Film Festival, and many other honors. Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, with special attention given to the performance of Frances McDormand. 

Asher also produced Zhao’s The Rider (2017), which premiered at the Cannes Directors Fortnight and won its top prize. The Rider went on to be nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards, including Best Picture, and won Best Feature at the 2018 Gotham Awards. In addition, Asher produced Zhao’s debut feature Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015); Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow  (2019), which won Best Actress at the Tribeca Film Festival; Fort Tilden (2014) by writer/director team Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers; and Anja Marquardt’s Spirit Award nominated She's Lost Control (2014). Asher recently co-founded the production company The Population, which is currently in post-production on Josef Kubota Wladyka’s thriller Catch the Fair One. Asher earned her MFA from NYU’s graduate film program and is a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

TW // Self Harm, Eating Disorder.

Free Virtual Screening of Swallow

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are also invited to a free virtual screening of Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow (2019), available for viewing from May 14 to 19. Produced by Mollye Asher, Swallow was an official selection at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival and won Best Actress at the festival. The free screening of Swallow will be made available online through the Eventive streaming platform and requires advance registration. Registrations are limited to the first 150 viewers on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

This series is funded by the generous Harlan J. Strauss Visiting Filmmaker Endowment.

Thank you to our cosponsors:

Asian Studies Program, Department of Art, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Department of German and Scandinavian, Department of History, Department of Romance Languages, Department of Theatre Arts, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship, Native American Studies, School of Journalism and Communication/Media Studies, School of Music and Dance.

May 20
Suzanne Simard: “Trees Communicate Through Networks in Complex Adaptive Systems”noon

Suzanne W. Simard is Professor of Forest Ecology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia. Her research...
May 20 noon–1:00 p.m.

Suzanne W. Simard is Professor of Forest Ecology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on the complexity and interconnectedness of nature and is guided by her deep connection to the land and her time spent amongst the trees. She is specifically known for her work on how trees communicate and interact using below-ground fungal (mycorrhizal) networks. Simard’s work with her students led to the recognition that forests have hub trees, or Mother Trees, which are large, highly connected trees that play an important role in the flow of information and resources in a forest. Trees interact with their own and other species, including forming kin relationships with their genetic relatives. Her current research investigates how these complex relationships contribute to forest resiliency, adaptability and recovery, as well as implications for sustainable stewardship of forest ecosystems as climate changes. Simard is the author of Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest (Penguin Random House, 2021). 

Free registration required.

 

Series Overview

What is Communication? (2021) will investigate instantiations and permutations of communication via models of exchange, modes of inquiry, and meanings of community. While communication has been conceptualized as models of transportation, transmission, and ritual communication is also characterized by modes of sharing, imparting, connecting, and participating. These characteristics can contribute to democracy, as well as facilitating the commons and community/fellowship. This year marks the sixth collaboration with scholars from the natural sciences, social sciences and arts.

Please see whatis.uoregon.edu for more details and other featured keynotes.

The What is…? Speaker Series is sponsored by the Knight Chair in Communication Research, UO Women in Graduate Science, the Oregon Humanities Center, New Media and Culture Program, and the Department of Philosophy. Additional gratitude to our supporters.

May 20
Natalie Ball: “Power Objects”4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 20 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Natalie Ball was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a Bachelor’s degree with a double major in Ethnic Studies and Art from the University of Oregon. She furthered her education in New Zealand at Massey University where she attained her Master’s degree, focusing on Indigenous contemporary art. Ball then relocated to her ancestral homelands to raise her three children. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including the Half Gallery, NY; Vancouver Art Gallery, BC; Blum & Poe, LA; Portland Art Museum, OR; Gagosian, NY; Seattle Art Museum, WA; Almine Rech Gallery, FR; and SculptureCenter, NY. Natalie attained her M.F.A. degree in Painting & Printmaking at Yale School of Art in 2018. She is the recipient of the 2020 Bonnie Bronson Award, 2020 Joan Mitchell Painters & Sculptors Grant, 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, and the 2018 Betty Bowen Award from the Seattle Art Museum.

 

 

May 21
Cinema Studies Presents: Screening of 'Nomadland'12:00 a.m.

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are invited to a free virtual screening of Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), available for viewing from May...
May 21–26

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are invited to a free virtual screening of Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), available for viewing from May 21 to 26. Produced by Mollye Asher, Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, winning Best Director and Best Picture at the 2021 Academy Awards and Golden Globe Awards in addition to numerous other awards.  For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

May 21 to 26
Free and open to the community
Advance registration required 

The free screening of Nomadland will be made available online through Searchlight Pictures' streaming platform, Debut, and requires advance registration by May 18 at 12:00 pm (PDT). Registrations are limited to the first 150 viewers on a first-come, first-served basis. After you RSVP, you will receive an email on May 21st from Searchlight Pictures' streaming platform, Debut, with viewing instructions on how to watch the film. The film will be accessible from 7:00 pm (PDT) on Friday, May 21, 2021 to 7:00 pm (PDT) on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 and you will have 72 hours to finish the film once you start watching it. For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

Nomadland (2020) 
Directed by Chloé Zhao | Produced by Mollye Asher | 108 Minutes | Rated R
2021 Academy Award and Golden Globe Winner for Best Picture and Best Director

Film synopsis: Following the economic collapse of a company town in rural Nevada, Fern (Frances McDormand) packs her van and sets off on the road exploring a life outside of conventional society as a modern-day nomad. The third feature film from director Chloé Zhao, Nomadland features real nomads Linda May, Swankie and Bob Wells as Fern’s mentors and comrades in her exploration through the vast landscape of the American West.

Nomadland is directed by Chloé Zhao (Songs My Brothers Taught Me, The Rider) is based on the book Nomadland: Surviving America In The Twenty-First Century by Jessica Bruder and stars Frances McDormand (Fargo, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), David Strathairn (Good Night, and Good Luck, Lincoln), Linda May and Swankie. The producers are Mollye Asher (Songs My Brothers Taught Me, The Rider), Dan Janvey (Beasts of the Southern Wild, Heart of a Dog), Frances McDormand (Olive Kitteridge) and Peter Spears (Call Me By Your Name). The director of photography is Joshua James Richards (Songs My Brothers Taught Me, The Rider).

Live, Remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher

On Wednesday, May 26 at 4:00 pm (PDT), join us for a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film and share how a producer supports a director’s vision. Visit cinema.uoregon.edu for more information on how to join the Q&A.

Mollye Asher is a Gotham Award-Winning producer and recipient of the 2020 Independent Spirit Producers Award. Most recently, she produced Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), which won Best Director and Best Picture Drama at the 2021 Golden Globe Awards, the Golden Lion Award for Best Film at the 2020 Venice Film Festival, and many other honors. Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, with special attention given to the performance of Frances McDormand. 

Asher also produced Zhao’s The Rider (2017), which premiered at the Cannes Directors Fortnight and won its top prize. The Rider went on to be nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards, including Best Picture, and won Best Feature at the 2018 Gotham Awards. In addition, Asher produced Zhao’s debut feature Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015); Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow  (2019), which won Best Actress at the Tribeca Film Festival; Fort Tilden (2014) by writer/director team Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers; and Anja Marquardt’s Spirit Award nominated She's Lost Control (2014). Asher recently co-founded the production company The Population, which is currently in post-production on Josef Kubota Wladyka’s thriller Catch the Fair One. Asher earned her MFA from NYU’s graduate film program and is a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

This series is funded by the generous Harlan J. Strauss Visiting Filmmaker Endowment.

Thank you to our cosponsors:

Asian Studies Program, Department of Art, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Department of German and Scandinavian, Department of History, Department of Romance Languages, Department of Theatre Arts, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship, Native American Studies, School of Journalism and Communication/Media Studies, School of Music and Dance.

May 21
“Cars, Trains, and Trolleys: Infrastructures of the Urban Space in the Andes (1900-1952)”noon

Javier Velasco, PhD candidate, Romance Languages, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Dissertation Fellow "In my dissertation on the discursive construction of the Andean...
May 21 noon

Javier Velasco, PhD candidate, Romance Languages, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Dissertation Fellow

"In my dissertation on the discursive construction of the Andean urban space, I explore how literary writing and other cultural texts represented, decoded and re-imagined the physical infrastructure of the city of La Paz during the years of formation and consolidation of the hegemonic project of the “criollo” elites between 1900 and 1952. From the category of “infrastructure,” referred to physical networks that constitute the underlying framework of a social system, I analyze the way in which the city’s infrastructures (railways, trains, trolleys, telegraph wires, roads and more) were as important in the physical actuality of the city as they were in shaping the economic, cultural and aesthetic modernity at the base of the literary production of the criollo elites. I refer to this process as the infrastructural construction of the “seignorial” space."

May 24
Student Study Abroad Panel: Living Abroad in Your Skin3:30 p.m.

Join a conversation about identity experiences abroad. Three student panelists, currently studying abroad in London and South Korea, will share their diverse backgrounds and...
May 24 3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Join a conversation about identity experiences abroad.

Three student panelists, currently studying abroad in London and South Korea, will share their diverse backgrounds and stories of their experiences while living and studying abroad. The current UO students will also be joined by a UO study abroad alumni who studied in China and can share her experience as it relates to her career and post-graduation life. 

Panelists:


Andromeda Blair, currently studying in London
Ava Jamerson, studied in China
Anna Kien, currently studying in South Korea
Pablo Macias, currently studying in London


Moderatorated by Rosa Chavez, Associate Director for CMAE

All are welcome to join the conversation to hear how personal identities can be expressed in a global context.

May 25
Shadow Suburbanism: Mexican Settlement and Immigration Enforcement in the Nuevo Southnoon

Please join the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies for this CLLAS Research Series Faculty presentation by John Arroyo (School of Planning, Public...
May 25 noon–1:00 p.m.

Please join the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies for this CLLAS Research Series Faculty presentation by John Arroyo (School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management).

Over the past 20 years, Mexican communities have bypassed historic, urban ethnic enclaves to settle in and physically transform suburban areas of U.S. South. Nowhere is this spatial “Latinization” phenomenon more acute than in small towns such as those in Gwinnett County (metropolitan Atlanta), one of the foremost frontiers of new immigrant destinations in America. Coinciding with the growth of predominantly undocumented Mexican immigrants in these regions have been popular state and county-level immigration policies —all of which have use explicit language to position states like Georgia to be a national pioneer of hyper immigration surveillance and a regional enforcement model for neighboring metropolitan areas. The culmination of these adverse effects has required Mexican residents to create covert, built environments. Findings from this research analyze the key reactionary anti-immigrant federalism policies that influence how Mexican immigrants reshape culturally-specific land use in suburban Atlanta. 

This is a remote event and will take place over Zoom. To join the CLLAS email list and receive Zoom login information, please email us at cllas@uoregon.edu or subscribe here.

May 26
Cinema Studies Presents: Q&A with Mollye Asher, Producer of 'Nomadland'4:00 p.m.

Students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film, Nomadland, and share how a producer...
May 26 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to a live, remote Q&A with Producer Mollye Asher who will discuss the film, Nomadland, and share how a producer supports a director’s vision. Visit cinema.uoregon.edu for more information on how to join the Q&A.

Free and open to the community.

Mollye Asher is a Gotham Award-winning producer and recipient of the 2020 Independent Spirit Producers Award. Most recently, she produced Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), which won Best Director and Best Picture Drama at the 2021 Golden Globe Awards, the Golden Lion Award for Best Film at the 2020 Venice Film Festival, and many other honors. Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, with special attention given to the performance of Frances McDormand. 

Asher also produced Zhao’s The Rider (2017), which premiered at the Cannes Directors Fortnight and won its top prize. The Rider went on to be nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards, including Best Picture, and won Best Feature at the 2018 Gotham Awards. In addition, Asher produced Zhao’s debut feature Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015); Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ Swallow  (2019), which won Best Actress at the Tribeca Film Festival; Fort Tilden (2014) by writer/director team Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers; and Anja Marquardt’s Spirit Award nominated She's Lost Control (2014). Asher recently co-founded the production company The Population, which is currently in post-production on Josef Kubota Wladyka’s thriller Catch the Fair One. Asher earned her MFA from NYU’s graduate film program and is a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

Free Virtual Screening of Nomadland

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are invited to a free virtual screening of Chloé Zhao's Nomadland (2020), available for viewing from May 21 to 26. Produced by Mollye Asher, Nomadland is one of the most acclaimed films of 2020, winning Best Director and Best Picture at the 2021 Academy Awards and Golden Globe Awards in addition to numerous other awards. For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

The free screening of Nomadland will be made available online through Searchlight Pictures' streaming platform, Debut, and requires advance registration by May 18 at 12:00 pm (PDT). Registrations are limited to the first 150 viewers on a first-come, first-served basis. After you RSVP, you will receive an email on May 21st from Searchlight Pictures' streaming platform, Debut, with viewing instructions on how to watch the film. The film will be accessible from 7:00 pm (PDT) on Friday, May 21, 2021 to 7:00 pm (PDT) on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 and you will have 72 hours to finish the film once you start watching it.  For more information and to register for the screening, please visit cinema.uoregon.edu.

This series is funded by the generous Harlan J. Strauss Visiting Filmmaker Endowment.

Thank you to our cosponsors:

Asian Studies Program, Department of Art, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Department of German and Scandinavian, Department of History, Department of Romance Languages, Department of Theatre Arts, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship, Native American Studies, School of Journalism and Communication/Media Studies, School of Music and Dance.

May 26
Healthy Relationships with Substances5:00 p.m.

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is putting on this event to encourage students to look at their use of substances. We want all students to know the signs of...
May 26 5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, BCC Porch

The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center is putting on this event to encourage students to look at their use of substances. We want all students to know the signs of healthy and unhealthy relationships regarding their use of substances.

May 27
Conversations About Our World Talk Series: Bioethics in the Time of Black Lives Matter: A Black Feminist Perspective4:30 p.m.

Last summer saw the convergence of two major threats to public health: the COVID-19 pandemic and the enduring value gap between white and Black lives (referenced in the name of...
May 27 4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m.

Last summer saw the convergence of two major threats to public health: the COVID-19 pandemic and the enduring value gap between white and Black lives (referenced in the name of the protest movement Black Lives Matter). On April 8th of this year, the CDC released a statement naming racism as "a serious public health threat." By contrast, six weeks earlier, the Journal of the American Medical Association released a podcast (now withdrawn) in which the very existence of structural racism in medicine (by now a well proven fact) was called into question. In this conversation, within this larger social and political context, we will discuss how the CDC declaration might be translated into action and what Black feminist bioethicists can contribute to the ongoing conversation. 

Speakers:


Camisha Russell, Assistant (about to be Associate as of May 1) Professor, UO Department of Philosophy, University of Oregon
Yolonda Wilson, Associate Professor, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, Saint Louis University 


Join University of Oregon faculty, Dr. Arafaat A. Valiani (Associate Professor, History | Sociology | Global Health), Dr. Sangita Gopal (Associate Professor, Cinema Studies), and Dr. Bish Sen (Associate Professor, School of Journalism and Communication) for a speakers series during spring term 2021. All events will be held virtually and feature conversations between faculty and speakers from the University of Oregon community and beyond. Topics include Indigenous arts, global communications after COVID, and identity in Asian and Asian Studies, and more.

Sponsors

Asian Studies Program
Center for Asian and Pacific Studies
Center for the Study of Women in Society
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Anthropology
Department of History
Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies
Department of Sociology
Global Health Program
Global Studies Institute, Division of Global Engagement
Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities

May 28
“Civil War Prisons and the Problem of Confederate Memory”noon

Timothy J. Williams, Clark Honors College, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow This book project is a cultural history of prisoners of war and the...
May 28 noon

Timothy J. Williams, Clark Honors College, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow

This book project is a cultural history of prisoners of war and the literature they wrote and published during the era of the US Civil War. It focuses on southern men held in northern prisons. These men played important roles in developing a unique genre of southern history commonly called the “Lost Cause,” which at once exalts southern military leadership and outlines southerners’ justifications for secession, slavery, and white supremacy. Their stories illustrate how this pernicious regional history took shape. In the process, it also reveals insight into wartime carceral culture and its impact on authorship and readership in the twentieth century.

Jun 4
“The Longest Resistance: Anti-Fascist Women between Franco and Hitler”noon

Gina Herrmann, Romance Languages, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow "This is a book project about Spanish and Catalan women whose struggle...
June 4 noon

Gina Herrmann, Romance Languages, and 2020-21 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow

"This is a book project about Spanish and Catalan women whose struggle against fascism began earlier and lasted longer than that of any of their continental comrades. I have analyzed the oral histories of these women, in which they recount their struggles during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), their fight against Franco’s dictatorship during and after World War II, their involvement in the French Resistance, and for some, their battle against Nazism. I contextualize the experiences by drawing on research on women survivors of the Holocaust and on the regimes of torture in Latin America. Women survivors in European narratives have been reluctant to speak about what they endured; by comparing the experiences of other groups of women, I have been able to cross national, temporal, and geographic boundaries to examine the coercion and terror that women political prisoner faced under fascist regimes."