Events

Jan 19
All Sizes Fit Art Recruitment12:00 a.m.

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All...
January 1 2019–February 17 2020
University Health & Counseling Center, 201

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All Sizes Fit focuses on three principles:

Attention: Be in touch with your body and its signals. Your body is excellent at regulating and letting you know what it needs in order to perform optimally.
Appreciation: Appreciate everything your body allows you to do and the pleasure it provides. It is because of your body that you can engage in the activities you love and enjoy what life has to offer.
Acceptance: Accept all the assets you have rather than longing for what you do not. Much of your body composition is predetermined by your genetics.

All entries due by Monday, February 17, 2020. After we receive your piece we will send another form for you to complete where you can share more about your piece (e.g. title, artist statement, etc.)

https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0Gj2ScYNXMI7EdD

1st Place Prize: $100 Duck Store Gift Certificate
2nd Place Prize: $75 Duck Store Gift Certificate
3rd Place Prize: $50 Duck Store Gift Certificate
Honorable Mentions (10): $10 Duck Store Gift Certificates

For any questions please contact Suzie Stadelman at sstadelm@uoregon.edu

We will accept entries from non-UO students, but only current UO students are eligible to win prizes. All entries will be screened to make sure they don't contain triggering or inappropriate imagery.

Jan 21
Graduate Research Colloquium: Gender and Sexuality in Latin Americanoon

Winter 2020 Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Graduate Research Colloquium: Gender and Sexuality in Latin America. “Inner Exile in Formation and Sustenance...
January 21 noon–2:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Winter 2020 Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Graduate Research Colloquium:
Gender and Sexuality in Latin America.

“Inner Exile in Formation and Sustenance of Racial, Sexual, and Gendered Communities in Chile and Argentina”
Jon Jaramillo, Romance Languages.

“LGBTQ+ Migrants: Strategizing Survival and Love at the U.S.-Mexico Border”
Polet Campos-Melchor, Anthropology.

"'A Luta Continua:' Gender-based Violence and the Politics of Justice and Care in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil"
Emily Masucci, Anthropology.

Moderated by Gabriela Martinez, SOJC, CLLAS

Light refreshments served.

Jan 23
Political Discussion Networks, Political Engagement, and the Latino Electorate4:00 p.m.

Featuring Marisa Abrajano, professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in...
January 23 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Featuring Marisa Abrajano, professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in developing ways to increase politics participation and civic engagement amongst racial/ethnic minorities. Her most recent book is White Backlash: Immigration, Race and American Politics (with Zoltan Hajnal, 2015). 

Jan 23
Study Abroad through Wildlands Studies!4:00 p.m.

Wildlands Studies is a UO-sponsored provider, where you are guaranteed credits and are able to access your financial aid. These programs are generally in remote locations which...
January 23 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Columbia Hall, 249

Wildlands Studies is a UO-sponsored provider, where you are guaranteed credits and are able to access your financial aid. These programs are generally in remote locations which require strenuous hiking and backpacking. Get 15 UO credits between 2-6 weeks depending on the project.

Check out the application process at https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/multicountry/wildlands-studies:

Summer 2020 Projects:


Australia focuses on Tropical Reefs and Rainforest
Belize focuses on Ecosystems and Cultures
Iceland focuses on the Arctic Ecosystems


Fall 2020 Projects:


Botswana focuses on Wildlife Conservation
Nepal focuses on Habitat Conservation
New Zealand focuses on Island Ecosystems
Peru focuses on Ecology and Conservation
 

Jan 23
Wine Chat: "Strange Cohabitations: Sharing Churches after the Reformation, 1530-2020"6:00 p.m.

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a...
January 23 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Civic Winery and Wines

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a 2019–20 OHC Faculty Research Fellow.

At one time or another, approximately 1,000 churches in Europe were shared by two or more Christian religions—Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinist. About 120 still exist today in France, Germany, and Switzerland; in recent years, a few new ones have been created. The story of how they formed, how they evolved, and how they faded away can tell us a great deal about the shifting meanings that ordinary people ascribed to community, religion, toleration, and intolerance from the sixteenth century to the present.

Jan 24
Disasters, Resilience, and the Next Generation12:30 p.m.

A Lecture on Lifeline Infrastructure and Community Resilience as part of the Le Val Lund Award. Featured speaker: Yumei Wang P.E., Resilience Engineer at Oregon Department of...
January 24 12:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

A Lecture on Lifeline Infrastructure and Community Resilience as part of the Le Val Lund Award.
Featured speaker: Yumei Wang P.E., Resilience Engineer at Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
Followed by a panel discussion with:

John DeWenter, Board Chair, Springfield Utility Board
Jeni Hall, Solar Project Manager, Energy Trust of Oregon
Mike Harryman, State Resilience Officer for Oregon
Moderated by Josh Bruce, Director, Oregon Partnership for Disaster Resilience.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics; cosponsored by Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and UO Safety and Risk Services. Part of the Wayne Morse Center's 2019-21 theme, Science, Policy, and the Public.

Free and open to the public.

Jan 27
AAGS Panel: Academic Jobs in Anthropologynoon

Panelists: Dr. Alison Carter, Dr. Scott Blumenthal, and Dr. Johanna Richlin. Description: Hear from recent hires in the anthropology department from the University of Oregon....
January 27 noon–1:30 p.m.
Condon Hall, 204

Panelists: Dr. Alison Carter, Dr. Scott Blumenthal, and Dr. Johanna Richlin.

Description: Hear from recent hires in the anthropology department from the University of Oregon. Bring questions about how to market yourself, the academic job market, job talks, campus visits, or any other questions you may have about academic jobs in anthropology.

Presented by the Association of Anthropology Graduate Students.

Jan 28
Public Talk by Dana Hercbergs, PhD5:00 p.m.

"Narrative and Memory in Jersualem: Seeking the Implicit in Ethnography."
January 28 5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Condon Hall, 204

"Narrative and Memory in Jersualem: Seeking the Implicit in Ethnography."

Jan 30
Jane Nam to Discuss Radical Korean Feminismnoon

Philosophy graduate student Jane Nam will present a noon talk entitled, “Escape the Corset: Radical Korean Feminism.” Nam received a 2019-20 graduate student research...
January 30 noon–1:30 p.m.
Hendricks Hall, 330 Jane Grant Room

Philosophy graduate student Jane Nam will present a noon talk entitled, “Escape the Corset: Radical Korean Feminism.” Nam received a 2019-20 graduate student research award for her work from the Center for the Study of Women in Society.

South Korea is often deemed the beauty capital of the world, as the cosmetic surgery hub and home to one of the largest beauty industries in the world. The faces of female K-pop idols and K-drama celebrities have come to symbolize the K-beauty standard: perfection.

Beginning in the summer of 2018, however, young Korean women began posting pictures of themselves on social media, with shaved heads, androgynous clothing, and smashed makeup products. “Why do I want to be pretty?” “Do I want to be pretty?” These are the questions young women are asking themselves as they partake in what they call, the Escape-the-Corset Movement, or Tal-Corset (in Korean). The goal? Freedom to be human, and not “woman.”

Nam connected with over fifty women following the #escapethecorset movement. Her research brings to light, the strength, intelligence, and courage of Korean women who have demonstrated not just their potential but also a capacity for activism through concrete acts of feminism.

More upcoming events can be found on the CSWS Events page.

Jan 31
Archaeology in Palau: Info Sessionnoon

This five-week study abroad program in the islands of the Palauan archipelago will include working with locals, students, and staff from Palau to excavate and analyze...
January 31 noon–12:30 p.m.
Condon Hall, Teaching Lab 203

This five-week study abroad program in the islands of the Palauan archipelago will include working with locals, students, and staff from Palau to excavate and analyze archaeological remains that date back to some of the earliest stages of prehistoric settlement in Micronesia ca. 3000 years ago.

Program Dates: 

Summer - July 25 to August 29, 2020

Application Deadlines:

Priority - February 15 (receive $100 program discount)

Final - March 15

Find out more or APPLY TODAY!

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/palau/archaeology-in-palau

Feb 4
Dublin, Ireland Study Abroad Info Session5:00 p.m.

Come eat FREE pizza and learn more about the summer 2020 Dublin, Ireland Study Abroad Program at the info session Tuesday, February 4th at 5 p.m. in the Cinema Studies Lab (267...
February 4 5:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Room 267 - Cinema Studies Lab

Come eat FREE pizza and learn more about the summer 2020 Dublin, Ireland Study Abroad Program at the info session Tuesday, February 4th at 5 p.m. in the Cinema Studies Lab (267 Knight Library). Cinema Studies Instructor André Sirois will be available to discuss the program and answer questions.

This summer study abroad program is designed for students who want to immerse themselves in cinema studies in Ireland. Students in this 5-week program will get to work both critically and creatively, taking a course on contemporary Irish cinema plus one on digital filmmaking or screenwriting.

More info here: https://cinema.uoregon.edu/study-abroad-2020

Feb 4
"Beyond Buzzwords: Reimagining the Default Settings of Technology and Society"7:30 p.m.

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to...
February 4 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, Professor Ruha Benjamin presents the concept of the “New Jim Code" to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite. We will also consider how race itself is a kind of tool designed to stratify and sanctify social injustice and discuss how technology is and can be used toward liberatory ends. This presentation takes us into the world of biased bots, altruistic algorithms, and their many entanglements, and provides conceptual tools to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. In doing so, it challenges us to question not only the technologies we are sold, but also the ones we manufacture ourselves.

Ruha Benjamin is an Associate Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University where she studies the social dimensions of science, technology and medicine, race and citizenship, knowledge and power. She is also the founder of the JUST DATA Lab, and a Faculty Associate in the Center for Information Technology PolicyProgram on History of ScienceCenter for Health and WellbeingProgram on Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Department of Sociology. She serves on the Executive Committees for the Program in Global Health and Health Policy and Center for Digital Humanities.

Benjamin's first book, People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press 2013), investigates the social dimensions of stem cell science with a particular focus on the passage and implementation of a “right to research” codified in California. Her second book, Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code (Polity 2019) examines the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development.

Feb 5
Women Voters: Race, Gender, and Dynamism in U.S. Presidential Elections6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jane Junn, University of Southern California. Jane Junn is a professor of political science and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Southern...
February 5 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Featuring Jane Junn, University of Southern California.

Jane Junn is a professor of political science and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Southern California. She is an expert on voting, political participation, public opinion, Asian American politics, gender and politics, racial and ethnic identity, and the politics of immigration in the United States. She is the author of five books, including The Politics of Belonging: Race, Immigration, and Public Opinion and Education and Democratic Citizenship in America. Her research on the intersection of gender, race, and voting has been widely cited by journalists and political commentators in the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center as part of its Democratic Governance Speaker Series. Cosponsored by the UO Center for the Study of Women in Society and UO Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 

Feb 6
Sylvanna M. Falcón lecture: "Finding 'Light born in darkness': The Urgency of Feminist Activism in These Times"noon

Dr. Sylvanna M. Falcón is an associate professor in the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies and the director of the Research Center for the...
February 6 noon–1:30 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Dr. Sylvanna M. Falcón is an associate professor in the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies and the director of the Research Center for the Americas at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research and teaching interests are in human rights activism, transnational feminism, racism and antiracism, and transitional justice in Peru. She is the author of Power Interrupted: Antiracist and Feminist Activists inside the United Nations (University of Washington Press, 2016), winner of the National Women’s Studies Association Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Award, and the co-editor of New Directions in Feminism and Human Rights (Routledge, 2011). She is a former UN co-consultant to the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women. She is also the producer and host of a weekly public affairs radio program called Voces Críticas/ Critical Voices, which seeks to decolonize the university one broadcast at a time.

Falcón’s talk is the second event in the 2019-20 Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, presented by the Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS). Six outstanding speakers—ranging from scholars of theatre and performance arts to the co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement—will deliver talks on the theme of “Gender, Power and Grief.”

“On a daily basis, we bear witness to the state-sponsored violence that renders the loss of certain lives and communities unworthy of grief,” said CSWS director Michelle McKinley, Bernard B. Kliks Professor, UO School of Law. McKinley said the roster of speakers for this year’s Lorwin Lectureship seeks both to honor the process of grief and the cultural practices of bereavement. “They show us that in a time where much of the state apparatus is structured to demean poor people—loving, honoring and grieving those bodies, and acknowledging what we have lost, is a radical emotional act,” she said.

Lorwin Lectureship events will run through June 4, 2020, at University of Oregon. Event details, including cosponsors, can be found on the CSWS website at csws.uoregon.edu.

The Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties is funded by a gift from Val and Madge Lorwin to the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences and School of Law.

Feb 10
AAGS: From Jacksonville to John Day: public archaeology, community history, and the search for Oregon's early Chinese residentsnoon

Speaker: Chelsea Rose, Southern Oregon University. Bio: Chelsea Rose is an historical archaeologist who focuses on the settlement and development of the American West. She...
February 10 noon–1:30 p.m.
Condon Hall, 204

Speaker: Chelsea Rose, Southern Oregon University.

Bio: Chelsea Rose is an historical archaeologist who focuses on the settlement and development of the American West. She graduated with honors from the University of Oregon and received her graduate degree in Cultural Resources Management from Sonoma State University.

Rose's recent work has included research in the Jacksonville Chinese Quarter, the homestead of frontier photographer Peter Britt, the native Hawaiian mining camp of Kanaka Flat, and the Historic Applegate Trail. Rose is Principal Investigator of the Oregon Chinese Diaspora Project, a multi-agency research partnership with a focus on Oregon's Chinese migrant history. Rose also regularly works with the media, students, and community volunteers to promote archaeological awareness and heritage stewardship and has been featured in magazines and books that aim to engage students with the STEM fields. Rose hosts Underground History, a monthly radio segment on Jefferson Public Radio's Jefferson Exchange, and is co-editor of the forthcoming book, Chinese Diaspora Archaeology in North America, which will be available from the University of Florida Press in in March 2020.

Presented by the Association of Anthropology Graduate Students.

Feb 12
UO Authors, Book Talks5:30 p.m.

Join us for a 30-minute presentation by author Kirby Brown (Associate Professor, Department of English) about his book, Stoking the Fire: Nationhood in Century Cherokee Writing,...
February 12 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Join us for a 30-minute presentation by author Kirby Brown (Associate Professor, Department of English) about his book, Stoking the Fire: Nationhood in Century Cherokee Writing, 1907-1970, followed by Q&A, a book signing, and light refreshments.

The publication of a book is a major achievement for authors and universities, representing significant investments of research, creativity, time, and resources. UO Authors, Book Talks is a pilot series that will celebrate books published by UO faculty authors. The two-part series will occur during the 2019-2020 academic year, with one event featuring one author in fall and winter.

Feb 18
Viral Economies: Bird Flue Experiments in Vietnam4:00 p.m.

Natalie Porter, Design Researcher, FreshForm Interactive (formerly Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame) In this talk, I examine a biosecurity...
February 18 4:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Natalie Porter, Design Researcher, FreshForm Interactive (formerly Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame)

In this talk, I examine a biosecurity experiment to produce H5N1-free poultry subpopulations in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. I describe how this experiment compels farmers to invest in new, commercial poultry, whose physiological make-up vital requirements alter longstanding labor practices and culturally-situated exchange relations. In so doing these experiments surface different ideas about the role of poultry in agricultural ecologies and economies, and different understandings of the role of commercial market standards in governing health subjects. I argue that in a global health landscaper characterized by increasingly market-oriented health programming, biosecurity experiments signal an emerging form of disease control, which collapses economic and epidemiological concerns, and privileges certain life forms and forms of life over others.

 

Feb 19
Luminous Voices: Xul Solar, Orphism, and the Aesthetics of New Media5:30 p.m.

This lecture, given by UO Assistant Professor of Spanish Mayra Bottaro, focuses on the artistic work and vision of Argentine artist Xul Solar (1887-1963) and how it engages early...
February 19 5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

This lecture, given by UO Assistant Professor of Spanish Mayra Bottaro, focuses on the artistic work and vision of Argentine artist Xul Solar (1887-1963) and how it engages early twentieth-century discourses on abstract art, new technology, and linguistic explorations. Bottaro’s lecture is based on her academic study as a 2018-2019 Oregon Humanities Center Faculty Research Fellow.

Feb 20
Satire and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Art Projects of Peregrine Honig2:00 p.m.

Peregrine Honig’s art, widely exhibited in the US, explores contemporary social dilemmas with whimsy wit. Honig will present her artistic practice as linking fairy tales and...
February 20 2:00 p.m.–3:20 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Peregrine Honig’s art, widely exhibited in the US, explores contemporary social dilemmas with whimsy wit. Honig will present her artistic practice as linking fairy tales and fantasy to controversial issues, as for example, class and gender struggles, child abuse, civil rights, and examine her perspectives with UO students in Professor of German, and Folklore and Public Culture Dorothee Ostmeier’s class on “Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic and Cynical Tales”. Honig’s print portfolio, Father Gander (2005-06), in the JSMA’s collection, will be on view in the lecture hall.

The artist’s visit is supported by a JSMA Academic Support Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, and the Clark Honors College.

Feb 20
Environmental Connect 4:00 p.m.

Environmental Connect is a professional networking event put on by the UO Environmental Studies Program.  20-30 environmentally focused businesses, government organizations,...
February 20 4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Crater Lake Room

Environmental Connect is a professional networking event put on by the UO Environmental Studies Program.  20-30 environmentally focused businesses, government organizations, municipalities, and non-profit organizations will be showcasing job, internship, and volunteer opportunities to students with an interest in pursuing a career path with environmental focus.  All are welcome. 

Mar 5
"On Rising Together: Creative and Collective Responses to the Climate Crisis"7:30 p.m.

What might we learn from the people living on climate change’s front lines about the future that we share? In this talk, Elizabeth Rush will speak about a...
March 5 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

What might we learn from the people living on climate change’s front lines about the future that we share? In this talk, Elizabeth Rush will speak about a small community on the eastern shore of Staten Island—a place that Hurricane Sandy both undid and remade from the ground up—investigating the storm's aftermath and the radical decisions residents made about how to overcome their shared vulnerability. She will give voice to those who have been traditionally left out of environmental discourse and how we might make the conversation more whole moving forward.

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore and Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Gaurdian, Harper’s, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, and the New Republic, among others. She is the recipient of fellowships and grants including the Howard Foundation Fellowship, awarded by Brown University; the Society for Environmental Journalism Grant; the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship; and the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers. She received her MFA in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University, and teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University. 

Mar 20
Romance Languages Seminar: Kelley León-Howarth and Heather Quarlesnoon

“Decolonizing the University: SHL and UO Library Faculty Bring Oregon Latinx History into the Classroom Through Exploration of the PCUN Archives” Our presentation...
March 20 noon–1:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), 340 Board Room

“Decolonizing the University: SHL and UO Library Faculty Bring Oregon Latinx History into the Classroom Through Exploration of the PCUN Archives”

Our presentation models one component of the RL SHL Critical Language Awareness curriculum. Classes held in the the Special Collections section of the Knight Library employ the Pineros y Campesinos Unidos (PCUN) Archive to decolonize academic language and space and serve as academic mentorship imbedded into the course curriculum. The content prioritizes Latinx communities in Oregon and teaches about a successful local resistance movement still active today.

Apr 8
m5 vibe and NU-Intel5:30 p.m.

Featuring musician and spoken word artist m5 vibe and NU-Intel, a conscious hip-hop band with an unique vibe and deep subject matter. Program is held in conjunction with Carrie...
April 8 5:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Featuring musician and spoken word artist m5 vibe and NU-Intel, a conscious hip-hop band with an unique vibe and deep subject matter. Program is held in conjunction with Carrie Mae Weems: The Usual Suspects.

Apr 21
Leonard Mlodinow Lecture7:30 p.m.

Leonard Mlodinow is a theoretical physicist and author, recognized for groundbreaking discoveries in physics, and as the author of five best-selling books. His most recent book is...
April 21 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

Leonard Mlodinow is a theoretical physicist and author, recognized for groundbreaking discoveries in physics, and as the author of five best-selling books. His most recent book is Elastic: flexible thinking in a time of change (2018).

Apr 30
What is Information? 5:00 p.m.

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience...
April 30–May 2
White Stag Block

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience will consider information and its transformational æffects—from documents to data; from facts and fictions to pattern recognition; from physical information to differential equations; and from volatility, uncertainty, and ambiguity to collective intelligence and wisdom. 

The tenth annual What is…? examines tapestries, temperaments, and topologies of information lenses and practices—including—social and technical, mathematical and semantic, physical and biological, economic and political, cultural and environmental information. Thus, information can be understood as physical, for instruction, and about epistemic systems. Next year’s gathering expands on What is Technology? (2019), which explored technology as tools, processes, and moral knowledge, as well as problem-solving and intelligent inquiry.

Plenary participants to be announced.

May 7
Wine Chat: "Cold War Coeds: The Untold Story of Japanese Students Sponsored by the US Military"6:00 p.m.

Between 1949 and 1966, at least 4,713 Japanese students, of whom 651 were women, studied at American graduate schools. They were supported by the best-known fellowships at...
May 7 6:00 p.m.
Civic Winery and Wines

Between 1949 and 1966, at least 4,713 Japanese students, of whom 651 were women, studied at American graduate schools. They were supported by the best-known fellowships at the time—the GARIOA (Government Account for Relief in Occupied Areas, 1949-1951), administered by the US Army, and Fulbright (in Japan since 1952). These young scholars were among the first people to travel abroad after World War II. They arrived bearing the burdens of the past, while possessing an openness to the future. They came to study in a land that had interned around 120,000 Japanese Americans during the war, but they persevered and were among the first women in the world who earned graduate degrees. At a time when being a housewife was held up as a middle-class ideal, many became professors, university chancellors, librarians, and translators. Others became leaders in medicine, journalism, athletics, and other male-dominated professions. Alisa Freedman recovers the forgotten history of mothers of academic fields in the humanities who transformed the roles women could play in education and the workforce.

Alisa Freedman is a Professor of Japanese Literature and Film at the University of Oregon. Much of her interdisciplinary work investigates how the modern urban experience has shaped human subjectivity, cultural production, and gender roles. She is a 2019–20 OHC Faculty Research Fellow.

May 14
'Deep Ethics in the Age of the Algorithm”7:30 p.m.

We discuss deep machine learning, deep surveillance, deep facial recognition—Thomas Friedman called 'deep” the word of 2019. What that word reveals is the role of...
May 14 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

We discuss deep machine learning, deep surveillance, deep facial recognition—Thomas Friedman called 'deep” the word of 2019. What that word reveals is the role of complexity in our modern technological understanding of the world; complexity used to be a problem, now it is a resource. And that complexity means that often we cannot wait for an outcome before we make an ethical judgement; ethics will have to be built into the complex algorithms that will decide who will get resources, who will get arrested, and, famously, who the automated car will crash into. In an age of deep machine learning we will need a deep ethics to keep pace. It is time to ask: what will that ethics look like?

Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D. is the Raymond F. Schinazi Distinguished Research Chair in Jewish Bioethics, a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Biological Behavior, and Sociology, and the Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. 

Dr. Wolpe spent 15 years as Senior Bioethicist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where he still serves as a bioethical consultant. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience, and sits on the editorial boards of over a dozen professional journals in medicine and ethics. He is a past President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities; the current President of the Association of Bioethics Program Directors; a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the country’s oldest medical society; a Fellow of the Hastings Center, the oldest bioethics institute in America; and served as the first National Bioethics Advisor to Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Jun 14
Cinema Studies 12:30 p.m.

June 14 12:30 p.m.
Straub Hall
Jun 14
Anthropology2:00 p.m.

June 14 2:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom
Jun 14
Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies4:00 p.m.

June 14 4:00 p.m.
Lokey Education Building, West Lawn
Jun 15
Environmental Studies12:30 p.m.

June 15 12:30 p.m.
Women's Quadrangle
Jun 15
Geography12:30 p.m.

June 15 12:30 p.m.
Condon Hall East Lawn