Events

Nov 18
AAGS: Life History Trade-offs in Reproduction and Cancernoon

Speaker: Dr. Amy Boddy, University of California, Santa Barbara. Bio: Amy M. Boddy is a human biologist and evolutionary theorist in the Department of Anthropology at the...
November 18 noon–1:30 p.m.
Condon Hall, 204

Speaker: Dr. Amy Boddy, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Bio: Amy M. Boddy is a human biologist and evolutionary theorist in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her work uses applications from evolution and ecology to understand human health and disease. She uses a combination of genomics, computational biology and evolutionary theory to understand life history trade-offs between survival and reproduction across different levels of biological organization. One component of her research program examines how environmental cues, such as high extrinsic mortality, may guide resource allocations to cancer defenses and reproduction. Current cancer research topics include comparative oncology, intragenomic conflict, cellular life history trade-offs, and early life adversity and cancer outcomes later in life. In addition to her cancer research, she studies maternal/fetal conflict theory and the consequences of fetal microchimeric cells in maternal health and disease.

Presented by the Association of Anthropology Graduate Students.

Nov 18
Nongovernmental Organizations in Southeast Asia: Info Session4:00 p.m.

Learn more about this four-week summer program, where you will meet with nonprofit/nongovernmental organization (NGO) leaders, learn about the NGO sector in this region, and work...
November 18 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Hendricks Hall, Hearth

Learn more about this four-week summer program, where you will meet with nonprofit/nongovernmental organization (NGO) leaders, learn about the NGO sector in this region, and work on a hands-on project for a local organization in Cambodia. The program will begin in Chiang Mai, Thailand, then travel to Bangkok, Thailand and Siem Reap, Cambodia, and will end in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The group will spend about one week in each city.

 

Program Dates: Summer: June 17–July 16

Priority Application Deadline: February 15 (receive $100 program discount)

Final Application Deadline: March 15

 

Find out more or APPLY TODAY!

 

Nov 20
A Good Provider is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jason DeParle, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist. His new book, A Good Provider is One Who Leaves, tells the story of an unforgettable family as they...
November 20 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Featuring Jason DeParle, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist.

His new book, A Good Provider is One Who Leaves, tells the story of an unforgettable family as they endure years of sacrifice and separation, willing themselves out of shantytown poverty into a new global middle class. Migration is changing the world–reordering politics, economics, and cultures across the globe. With nearly 45 million immigrants in the United States, few issues are as polarizing. But if the politics of immigration is broken, immigration itself—tens of millions of people gathered from every corner of the globe—remains an underappreciated American success.

Jason DeParle is a senior writer at The New York Times and a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine. Previously he served as a domestic correspondent in Washington for The Times. Prior to joining The Times, Mr. DeParle was an editor at The Washington Monthly since 1987.

A Democratic Governance Speaker Series event, sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center and the UO School of Journalism and Communication. 

 

Nov 20
FREE Screening of "Pain and Glory" (2019) at the Broadway Metro7:00 p.m.

UO students, faculty and staff are invited to a free screening of Writer and Director Pedro Almodóvar’s latest award-winning film, Pain and Glory, at...
November 20 7:00 p.m.
Broadway Metro

UO students, faculty and staff are invited to a free screening of Writer and Director Pedro Almodóvar’s latest award-winning film, Pain and Glory, at the Broadway Metro. Take a study break and enjoy time with the UO community! Plus, everyone in attendance will have a chance to win free Broadway Metro gift cards and Cinema Studies gear! #UOCINEBroadwayMetro

UO ID required for admittance.

Synopsis: Pain and Glory tells of a series of re-encounters experienced by Salvador Mallo, a film director in his physical decline. Some of them in the flesh, others remembered: his childhood in the 60s, when he emigrated with his parents to a village in Valencia in search of prosperity, the first desire, his first adult love in the Madrid of the 80s, the pain of the breakup of that love while it was still alive and intense, writing as the only therapy to forget the unforgettable, the early discovery of cinema, and the void, the infinite void that creates the incapacity to keep on making films. Pain and Glory talks about creation, about the difficulty of separating it from one’s own life and about the passions that give it meaning and hope. In recovering his past, Salvador finds the urgent need to recount it, and in that need he also finds his salvation.

Rated R |  1h 53min | written and directed by Pedro Almodóvar  | starring Antonio Banderas, Penélope Cruz, Asier Etxeandia

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. First come, first served. UO ID required for admittance.

Nov 21
Muslim & Arab Diasporic Film Festivalnoon

"Signature Move" (2017) film and talk by Fawzia Mirza. IMDB synopsis: "Zaynab, a thirty-something Pakistani, Muslim, lesbian in Chicago takes care of her sweet...
November 21 noon–2:00 p.m.
McKenzie Hall, 125

"Signature Move" (2017) film and talk by Fawzia Mirza.

IMDB synopsis: "Zaynab, a thirty-something Pakistani, Muslim, lesbian in Chicago takes care of her sweet and TV-obsessed mother. As Zaynab falls for Alma, a bold and very bright Mexican woman, she searches for her identity in life, love and wrestling. "

Nov 21
Indigenous Rights and Environmental Justice in Bolivia: Info Session4:00 p.m.

Come learn about a three-week, summer study abroad course in Bolivia where you will live in autonomous indigenous territories and learn from locals and UO Professor Derrick...
November 21 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, 245

Come learn about a three-week, summer study abroad course in Bolivia where you will live in autonomous indigenous territories and learn from locals and UO Professor Derrick Hindery. The course is focused on service learning, community, and the interaction between indigenous rights and environmental protection.

 

Programs Dates:

Mid-June to July 2020

Applications Deadlines:

Priority - February 15 receive $100 program discount

Final - March 15

Find out more or APPLY TODAY!

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/bolivia/indigenous-rights-and-environmental-justice-in-bolivia

Nov 21
Latinx Environmentalisms Book Party4:00 p.m.

Join us for a book party celebration and talk with the co-editors for Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial, featuring Priscilla Solis Ybarra and Sarah...
November 21 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Maple Room 239

Join us for a book party celebration and talk with the co-editors for Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial, featuring Priscilla Solis Ybarra and Sarah Jaquette Ray. Priscilla Solis Ybarra is associate professor in the Department of English at the University of North Texas. Sarah Jaquette Ray is a graduate of the UO’s doctoral program in environmental sciences, studies and policy, and associate professor of environmental studies at Humboldt State University.

Light refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Nov 23
UO and LCC Round Dance!4:00 p.m.

The FIRST interscholastic Round Dance hosted by University of Oregon and Lane Community College. This will include a frybread stand, a raffle for 15 amazing prizes, as well as...
November 23 4:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m.
Lane Community College Longhouse

The FIRST interscholastic Round Dance hosted by University of Oregon and Lane Community College.

This will include a frybread stand, a raffle for 15 amazing prizes, as well as a singing contest for any drum groups! Please join us for this exciting celebration of Native American Heritage Month! Meet some new friends and jam to some roundies!

This event will take place at the Lane Community College Longhouse from 4-11 p.m. on Saturday, November 23.

Nov 25
Archaeology in Palau: Info Session5:00 p.m.

This five-week study abroad program in the islands of the Palauan archipelago will include working with locals, students, and staff from Palau to excavate and analyze...
November 25 5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Condon Hall, Teaching Lab (204)

This five-week study abroad program in the islands of the Palauan archipelago will include working with locals, students, and staff from Palau to excavate and analyze archaeological remains that date back to some of the earliest stages of prehistoric settlement in Micronesia ca. 3000 years ago.

Program Dates:

July 25 - August 29, 2020

Applications Deadlines:

Priority - February 15 (receive $100 program discount)

Final - March 15 

Find out more or APPLY TODAY!

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/palau/archaeology-in-palau

Jan 23
Wine Chat: "Strange Cohabitations: Sharing Churches after the Reformation, 1530-2020"6:00 p.m.

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a...
January 23 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Civic Winery and Wines

David Luebke is a historian of early modern Europe whose work focuses on the religions and political cultures of ordinary people in the German-speaking lands. He is a 2019–20 OHC Faculty Research Fellow.

At one time or another, approximately 1,000 churches in Europe were shared by two or more Christian religions—Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinist. About 120 still exist today in France, Germany, and Switzerland; in recent years, a few new ones have been created. The story of how they formed, how they evolved, and how they faded away can tell  us a great deal about the shifting meanings that ordinary people ascribed to community, religion, toleration and intolerance from the sixteenth century to the present.

Feb 4
Ruha Benjamin Lecture7:30 p.m.

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University where I study the social dimensions of science, technology, and...
February 4 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University where I study the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine, race and citizenship, knowledge and power. I am also the founder of the JUST DATA Lab, and a Faculty Associate in the Center for Information Technology PolicyProgram on History of ScienceCenter for Health and WellbeingProgram on Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Department of Sociology. I serve on the Executive Committees for the Program in Global Health and Health Policy and Center for Digital Humanities.

My first book, People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press 2013), investigates the social dimensions of stem cell science with a particular focus on the passage and implementation of a “right to research” codified in California. My second book, Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code (Polity 2019) examines the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development. I also edited a volume titled Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life (Duke University Press 2019), which brings together an incredible set of scholars to explore the interplay between innovation and containment across a wide array of social arenas, past and present. Finally, my next book project is tentatively titled The Emperor’s New Genes: Borders, Belonging, and Bioethics Beyond the Genome. It is a multi-sited investigation of how human population genomics reflects, reinforces, and sometimes challenges sociopolitical distinctions such as race, caste, and citizenship, focusing on initiatives in the US, South Africa, and India.

Taken together, this body of work addresses debates about how science and technology shape the social world and how people can, should, and do engage technoscience, grappling all the while with the fact that what may bring health and longevity to some may threaten the dignity and rights of others.

Feb 12
UO Authors, Book Talks5:30 p.m.

Join us for a 30-minute presentation by author Kirby Brown (Associate Professor, Department of English) about his book, Stoking the Fire: Nationhood in Century Cherokee Writing,...
February 12 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Join us for a 30-minute presentation by author Kirby Brown (Associate Professor, Department of English) about his book, Stoking the Fire: Nationhood in Century Cherokee Writing, 1907-1970, followed by Q&A, a book signing, and light refreshments.

The publication of a book is a major achievement for authors and universities, representing significant investments of research, creativity, time, and resources. UO Authors, Book Talks is a pilot series that will celebrate books published by UO faculty authors. The two-part series will occur during the 2019-2020 academic year, with one event featuring one author in fall and winter.

Mar 5
Elizabeth Rush Lecture7:30 p.m.

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore and Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon,...
March 5 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore and Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Gaurdian, Harper’s, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard and the New Republic, among others. She is the recipient of fellowships and grants including the Howard Foundation Fellowship, awarded by Brown University; the Society for Environmental Journalism Grant; the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship; and the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers. She received her MFA in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University, and teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University. 

Apr 21
Leonard Mlodinow Lecture7:30 p.m.

Leonard Mlodinow is a theoretical physicist and author, recognized for groundbreaking discoveries in physics, and as the author of five best-selling books. His most recent book is...
April 21 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

Leonard Mlodinow is a theoretical physicist and author, recognized for groundbreaking discoveries in physics, and as the author of five best-selling books. His most recent book is Elastic: flexible thinking in a time of change (2018).

Apr 30
What is Information? 5:00 p.m.

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience...
April 30–May 2
White Stag Block

What is Information? (2020) will investigate conceptualizations and implementations of information via material, representational, and hybrid frames. The conference-experience will consider information and its transformational æffects—from documents to data; from facts and fictions to pattern recognition; from physical information to differential equations; and from volatility, uncertainty, and ambiguity to collective intelligence and wisdom. 

The tenth annual What is…? examines tapestries, temperaments, and topologies of information lenses and practices—including—social and technical, mathematical and semantic, physical and biological, economic and political, cultural and environmental information. Thus, information can be understood as physical, for instruction, and about epistemic systems. Next year’s gathering expands on What is Technology? (2019), which explored technology as tools, processes, and moral knowledge, as well as problem-solving and intelligent inquiry.

Plenary participants to be announced.