Sarah D. Wald

Sarah D. Wald profile picture
  • Title: Associate Professor, Environmental Studies & English
  • Additional Title: Director of Graduate Admissions for English
  • Phone: 541-346-1613
  • Office: 443 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall term: Fellowship; not teaching; no office hours
  • Departments: English Department, Environmental Studies
  • Affiliated Departments: Food Studies, IRES, Latinx
  • Interests: Environmental Justice, Environmental Humanities, Asian American Literary and Cultural Studies, Latinx Literary and Cultural Studies, Food Studies, Farmworker Justice, Immigration/Migration, 20/21st Century US Literature, American Studies
  • Website: Website

Education

Ph.D., American Studies (formerly American Civilization), Brown University, May 2009.

M.A., American Studies (formerly American Civilization), Brown University, May 2004.

B.A., American Studies, Reed College, May 2001.

Publications

Books

Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial, co-edited volume with David J. Vázquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, and Sarah Jaquette Ray. Temple University Press, November 2019.

The Nature of California: Race, Citizenship, and Farming since the Dust Bowl. University of Washington Press, May 2016.

Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals

“Farmworkers and the Alternative Food Movement in U.S. Debates about Citizenship, Immigration, and Agricultural Labor.” Diálogo 19.2 (2016): 63-68.

 “‘Refusing to Halt’: Mobility and the Quest for Spatial Justice  in Helena María Viramontes’s Their Dogs Came with Them and Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange.” Western American Literature 48.1 + 48.2 (2013): 70-89.

“Visible Farmers/Invisible Workers: Locating Immigrant Labor in Food Studies.” Food, Culture, and Society 14.4 (2011): 567-86.

Chapters in Edited Collections

“Leisure over Labor: Latino Outdoors and the Production of a Latinx Outdoor Recreation Identity.” Cambridge Companion to American Literature and the Environment. March 2022. 

 “America Is in the Heart as Postcolonial Pastoral: A Case Study of Carlos Bulosan,” Asian American Literature in Transition Vol 2 (1930-1965). Eds. Victor Bascara and Josephine Lee. Cambridge University Press, August 2021.  

 “Farmworker Activism.” Cambridge Companion to Food and Literature. Ed. J. Michelle Coghlan. Cambridge University Press, 2020. 197-214. 

 “Agriculture and Asian American Literature” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Literature. Oxford University Press, 2020.  (Online publication October 2019).  

            Translated and Published in Journal of Poyang Lake

“Constructing Latinidad in National Parks: Consumer Citizenship and Nation Building in the National Park Foundation’s Outreach Efforts to Latinas/os.” Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial. Eds. Sarah D. Wald, David J. Vázquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, and Sarah Jaquette Ray. Temple University Press, November 2019. 52-75.

“‘The bodies of the earth are available for full exploitation’: An Interview with Helena María Viramontes” with David Vázquez and Paula M.L. Moya. Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial. Eds. Sarah D. Wald, David J. Vázquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, and Sarah Jaquette Ray. Temple University Press, November 2019. 164-176.

“‘An Organic Being in the Middle of Chicago: An Interview with Ana Castillo” with Priscilla Solis Ybarra. Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial. Eds. Sarah D. Wald, David J. Vázquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, and Sarah Jaquette Ray. Temple University Press, November 2019. 131-144.

“Sustainable Harvests: Food Justice, Community-Based Learning, and Environmental Justice Pedagogy.” Service Learning and Literary Studies in English. Eds. Laurie Grobman and Roberta Rosenberg. New York: Modern Language Association Press, 2015. 224-234. 

“Hisaye Yamamoto as Radical Agrarian.” Asian American Literature and the Environment.  Eds. Lorna Fitzsimmons, Youngsuk Chae, and Bella AdamsNew York: Routledge Press, 2014. 149-66.

 “Planting Japanese Roots in U.S. Soil: Ecological Citizenship in David Mas Masumoto’s Harvest Son and Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston’s The Legend of Fire Horse Woman.American Studies, Ecocriticism, and Citizenship: Thinking and Acting in the Local and Global Commons. Eds. Joni Adamson and Kimberly Ruffin. New York: Routledge Press, 2012. 87-100.

 “‘We ain’t foreign’: Constructing the Joads’ White Citizenship.” The Grapes of Wrath: A Reconsideration. Michael J. Meyer, ed. Dialogue Series. Volume 2. Atlanta: Rodopi Press, 2009. 481-505.

Digital Humanities Projects

Racial Ecologies of Mt. Hood National Forest. https://blogs.uoregon.edu/mounthoodstories/  Launched December 2021.  Project Lead. Collaboration with UO Libraries Dream Lab (Kate Thornhill and Gabrielle Hayden), Bark (Courtney Rae), and the graduate students in ENG 660: Racial Ecologies.